Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018731/001.

Names and composition

"BUSPAR" is the commercial name of a drug composed of BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018731/001 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018731/002 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018731/003 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018731/004 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
021190/001 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG
021190/002 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 7.5MG
021190/003 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
021190/004 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 15MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018731/001 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018731/002 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018731/003 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018731/004 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
021190/001 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG
021190/002 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 7.5MG
021190/003 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
021190/004 BUSPAR BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 15MG
074253/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074253/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
074253/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
075022/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
075022/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075022/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
075022/004 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
075119/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
075119/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075119/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
075385/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
075385/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
075385/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
075388/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
075388/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075388/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
075413/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
075413/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075413/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
075467/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
075467/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
075467/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075467/004 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
075521/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
075521/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075521/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
075572/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
075572/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075572/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076008/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076008/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
076008/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076008/004 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076008/005 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
078246/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
078246/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
078246/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
078246/004 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
078302/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
078888/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
078888/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
078888/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
078888/004 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
202087/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
202087/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
202087/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
202087/004 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
202330/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
202330/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
202330/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
202330/004 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
202557/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
202557/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
202557/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
202557/004 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
202557/005 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
204582/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
204582/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
204582/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
204582/004 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
208829/001 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
208829/002 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
208829/003 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
208829/004 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
208829/005 BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE BUSPIRONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG

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Answered questions

Anybody else take Buspar?
I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or... Asked by Leonore Busman 2 years ago.

I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or should I take it twice a day no matter what? Thanks! Answered by Rheba Bustillo 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) needs to be taken continuously for it to have any benefit. It does need to be taken exactly as it is prescribed, normally people take about 30 mg divided in 2-3 doses. BuSpar is not a medication that provides rapid relief of anxiety. Like antidepressants BuSpar typically takes 2-4 weeks for benefits. The dose of both medications are fairly low so you may not have any response until your doctor increases the doses. So yes take it twice a day everyday no matter what. If you are not seeing a psychiatrist you really should find one. Typically a general practitioner is not capable of treating trichotillomania effectively. In addition a consultation with a dermatologist is often a good idea. Lastly there are a number of mediations that have been studied for trichotillomania and several have shown promising results. Neither BuSpar or Celexa (citalopram) have been specifically studied for trichotillomania however other medications have been including Orap (pimozide), Anafranil (clomipramine), Prozac (fluoxetine), Luvox (fluvoxamine), and lithium. Using Orap with either Anafranil or Prozac has demonstrated the greatest efficacy. Some of the studies have been based on the idea trichotillomania is related to Tourette syndrome or obsessive compulsive disorder which is why drugs approved for those indications are the most studied. Lithium has also shown some very favourable results. The antidepressant Norpramin (desipramine) was found to have little benefit. Answered by Lindsay Badlam 2 years ago.

If the bottle says "as needed for anxiety" it indeed means to take it only if you are anxious. However, Buspar is not really a medications you take on an "as needed" basis. Also, the does is relatively low (not too low, just lowish). Is the doctor who prescribed you those medications a specialist in psychiatry or a primary care doctor? If it is not a psychiatrist or psychiatric nurse practitioner, I would strongly suggest you go see one for a consultation because primary care doctors often under dose medications. However, I obviously do not know the situation or specifics... Independent from the above, I'd also strongly recommend therapy I've you're not already doing that. It's generally very effective for anxiety disorders. Answered by Ozie Males 2 years ago.

I took Buspar, Effexor, and Trileptal for depression and anxiety, but now am off of all of it because I think and my doctor thinks that it was causing me other problems (high white blood cell count, infection). I don't need other health problems so I just got off all of it. I just try to deal with my problems on my own and with God. EDIT: Have your thyroid checked. It's not in top shape even when the doctor says it's okay sometimes. Research it on the internet. Answered by Katrice Stiltner 2 years ago.

i took every anti-anxiety med known to man and didn't like any of them. i found that a b vitamin complex did the trick better, anyways. Answered by Kasey Roeder 2 years ago.

I took that **** for only 2 days. I was dizzy and my ears were ringing. I despised it and never took it again. Answered by Hildegarde Perona 2 years ago.


Buspar question?
I am only on my second day of Buspar. And I have had 3 panic attacks. I feel like it is making it worse instead of better. And I am EATING a LOT. Does anyone hae any experiene with Buspar? Will my eating subside? How soon will theese attacks subside? thank you Asked by Rodney Della 2 years ago.

Being on your second day of Buspar, it is hard to say if it's going to work for you or not. You need to give a medication such a Buspar time to build up in your system. Buspar is not a fast acting anxiety medication such as Klonopin, Lorazepam, or any others. It needs a chance in order to get mainstreamed in your system. I was on Buspar for about 2 years and I found that it was wonderful for me. I didn't have a problem with being hungry all the time or over eating, but I'm not sure that you do either. I think that when people have anxiety attacks often, their stomachs are being sabotaged by the constant production of adrenaline. Adrenaline, when released into the body, temporarily stops all digestive function. We get used to this as we live with our anxiety being untreated. Once you begin the therapy of your choice, I believe that the desire to eat is because you are hungry. Your anxiety is suppressed and your body begins to mend. Anxiety is very traumatizing to your system. It's going to take some time for all of this to come together for you. If you are worried about weight gain, then watch your diet, eat only when you are truely hungry, and excercise if you want to. You can also try another form of anxiety supression that better suits your and your lifestyle. Just know that anxiety is tricky and hard to live with, but that does not mean that through trial and error you can not find something that will help you to feel better. The attacks that you are having now, should subside, but this may take up to a month before you see any sign of improvement. I know that seems like an eternity, but if it's going to work for you in the long run, isn't it worth giving it a shot and sticking it out? In the mean time, drink chamomile tea, stay away from caffeine, try to relax and pay attention to where and how you breathe. These are all things that in little ways can help you to cope with the attacks that you do have. I hope that I have been of some help to you. I know how hard it is to feel like you are not going to make it sometimes, but believe me, you can and you will. Keep fighting and take back control of your life. Have a good day and take care. Answered by Morris Weslow 2 years ago.

Eh..I would lay off the alcohol for a while until you figure out how buspar effects you. It is a pretty heavy duty anxiolytic drug and is usually taken with other mental health conditions. It works tho, so take it. Buspar can make you sleepy, lethargic, and generally out of it. Alcohol can makes these effects worse, and it can get to the point where you may stop breathing. You're going to drink no matter what, so just wait for around 14 days, about how long it takes for the med to fully take effect, before drinking. Limit the intake to a few drinks no more than three times a week because there are dangerous interactions like liver failure involved. Be safe and I hope you get a grip on your anxiety. Answered by Zachariah Diorio 2 years ago.

I am currently taking Buspar twice a day to keep from feeling anxious. It seems to be working for me. There are days that I don't take it, so give it a chance. If you are still having panic attacks call your doctor and have him put you on Xanax and you will feel the anxiety subside after 30 minutes of taking the medication. Answered by Zelda Brittman 2 years ago.

I took buspar for about a year, I can't really say that it really worked for me at all.I always had an appetite with it and the weight gain alone just added to the attacks but I was always talked into continuing with the meds until I finally said enough was enough. After years of fighting anxiety attacks (which I sympathize with you, they really suck to say the LEAST!) I have found a tea called Organic Nighty Night to work the best for me. Traditional Medicinals makes it and the tea can be found in most grocery stores or vitamin shops. Hope this helps. Just remember to say to yourself that they are just an anxiety attack, you are all right and they WILL NOT win. You are master not the anxiety! Answered by Kathlyn Thress 2 years ago.

If it is making you feel worse, I would quit taking it and tell your doctor. Maybe they could call in something else for you to try. Meds affect each person differently, what works for some don't work at all for someone else, or have unwanted side effects. Good luck Answered by Kami Koellmann 2 years ago.


Buspar (busporine hcl)?
My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a... Asked by Arielle Mccook 2 years ago.

My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a time. It also makes me a little drowsy, and does wear off within 3 hours and I can feel the nervous feeling again after. CAN this medicine be working for me like this and has it worked like this for anyone else. I have NEVER taken a benzo such as Xanax so maybe this is why I can feel it working because I have not been exposed to anything stronger. I also do not take meds (part of my anxiety) I have to fight myself to take the Buspar to feel better and then I thank myself later. I just don't want to cause my self any harm taking it like this as I have heard taking things like Lexapro as needed will mess your brain up bad. Thanks! Answered by Lindsay Poskey 2 years ago.

BuSpar (busprione): Acts by inhibiting the action of serotonin (5-HT); has shown little potential for abuse, a good choice in substance abuse. USes : Management and short-term relief of anxiety disorders. Adult: PO 5 mg tid; may increase by 5 mg/day q2-3d, not to exceed 60 mg/day. Available forms: 5, 10, 15 mg. Alex...this drug is not a classified Benzodiazepine/controlled substance, it is an Azaspirodecanedione/non narctic drug. Lexapro is neither a classified Benzodiazepine. It is a non narcotic drug specifically prescribed for chemical imbalances in the brain. Management of long term relief of anxiety, depression, ... Uses: Major depressive order, anxiety, pyscotic episodes relating to chemical imbalance of brain. While benzos have addictive personalities, due to controlled substance, and can possibly change ones character, not always for the good, BuSpar nor Lexapro contain substance abuse charaters. These medications are prescribed for daily use in order to be effective. It is said that these medications require a 7 day range for optimal relief, however many patients have reported relief in as few as 2-3 days. All medications can become addictive, especially with patients having an addictive nature. All patients have different chemistry make-up, therefore, what may be correct for one, does not fair well for another. Everyone has their story. No one knows your story but you. There are many who have said Lexapro did not work for them. Many have said Lexapro messes with your mind and you should stay away from it. And I'm sure that they believe this due to their experience. However, as I said, one medication is not the answer for everyone. In my case, I began having pyscotic episodes, seeing and hearing things, becoming lost on the way to work or home. I was lucky enough to remain in reality to the extent of realising something was wrong, just didn't know what. I was sent to a Pyschiatrist in the Behavioral Center and was diagnosed with a chemical imbalance, which I was told is quite common in situations in which I had been subjected to, and in such the length of time I had been under these circumstances. So, no one can give you the precise medication to take. It's a question of what works for you. I am all the time suggesting Lexapro because it brought me back into the world. It saved my job, my family, it saved me from losing myself and everyone around me. I also suggest it whenever narcotics are being used, or with non narcotic yet addictive personalities are prescribed. Many of us have problems, and we should try to handle or cope with them without running to the pills. Pills are not a cure, and they cannot erase our problems. In fact, many of us find out much later that the pills are our biggest problem. I do not recommend using pills for the everyday stress of life. However, when I recognize the signs of my own personal experience, or other much more dangerous pills are being taken, YES...I suggest giving Lexapro a try. Hope this has helped rather than offend. Take care, Alex! Answered by Nubia Dagel 2 years ago.


Buspar and alcohol interaction?
I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking... Asked by Elizabet Metenosky 2 years ago.

I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking this medication." so what i want to know is why is it best to avoid alcohol when it apparently has no side effects with alcohol? Answered by Eddy Casanas 2 years ago.

Buspar And Alcohol Answered by Robert Sosnowski 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Buspar and alcohol interaction? I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid... Answered by Mirtha Snead 2 years ago.

The main reason being that when you ingest alcohol it enters the bloodstream and depending on the amount of alcohol in the bloodstream then the amount of other chemicals is diminished and since the Buspar affects the nervous system if there is an absence of enough chemical to work properly then the drug is ineffective and the sensory receptors may receive false signals thus sending incorrect data to the brain causing anxiety, insomnia or seizures( the side effects may be enhanced by taking alcohol and cutting the presence of the Buspar in the bloodstream). Answered by Rosario Slappey 2 years ago.

Buspirone And Alcohol Answered by Lamonica Gerst 2 years ago.

ARE ANY OF YOU PEOPLE DOCTORS? OR ARE YOU JUST RUNNING YOUR MOUTHS---CITE SOME SOURCES TO BACK UP YOUR CLAIMS---OTHERWISE YOUR INFO IS USELESS TO ME Answered by Hortencia Selbig 2 years ago.


Xanax vs buspar and valerian root?
I am trying to get away from benzos. Please let me know if anyone has had any positive results with valerian root or buspar. Let me put it this way...Has anyone had any "xanax type results or relief" with either of these medications. Please let me know. This is so important to me. Thank you. Asked by Amee Toupin 2 years ago.

BuSpar is actually quite famous for being HATED by ex-benzo users. The type of fix a benzo user is expecting is a rapid and complete relief from crippling anxiety. BuSpar works totally differently and may take weeks (3-6) to completely kick in, and it must be taken everyday, not just when anxiety strikes, as that will do nothing. Also, daily doses above 30mg are required, but most doctors start out low and hope for the best, when this rarely works. I did not have a positive result. All BuSpar did was make me tired, and at bad times of the day like when I was sitting at class at 11am! As for valerian root, most of the information on wikipedia is about the closest you are going to get to anything, and like BuSpar it must be taken everyday and may take weeks to work. Answered by Norene Cookman 2 years ago.


Is the medicine Buspar considered an older anxiety medication?
Or is it still widely prescribed? Asked by Nikole Anhalt 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) was FDA approved September 29, 1986 so it is a fairly new medication approved for generalized anxiety disorder (it is not indicated for any other anxiety disorders). To give you a comparison here are other FDA approved medications for anxiety and the dates they were FDA approved: Butisol (butabarbital) June 5, 1939 Miltown (meprobamate) April 28, 1955 Librium (chlordiazepoxide) February 24, 1960 Valium (diazepam) November 15, 1963 Ativan (lorazepam) September 30, 1977 Xanax (alprazolam) October 16, 1981 BuSpar (buspirone) September 29, 1986 <----- BuSpar Paxil (paroxetine) December 29, 1992 Effexor (venlafaxine) December 28, 1993 BuSpar is still widely prescribed. In The United States there were 5.4 million prescriptions written in 2009, a 35% increase over the year before making it the 18th most prescribed psychiatric medication in The US. Answered by Blair Whiteman 2 years ago.

It is an older anxiety medication, but it is still prescribed. I don't know how widely, but it's commonly available in pharmacies. Answered by Sharleen Dine 2 years ago.


My boyfriend took 6 buspar being an *** because we were fighting...?
He forgot 30 minutes later he'd taken them and couldn't get off the couch to go throw them up like I wanted him to do. He's currently snoring. (20 mins later)... on the floor. 6 buspar won't kill him right? He's 260lbs. Drank one drink before that. Asked by Stefany Jendras 2 years ago.

CALL 911. BuSpar is an anti-anxiety medicine that affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety. BuSpar is used in the treatment of anxiety disorders and and for short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety, such as fear, tension, irritability, dizziness, pounding heartbeat, and other physical symptoms. BuSpar may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Do not use BuSpar if you are allergic to buspirone, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take BuSpar before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. BuSpar can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase some of the side effects caused by BuSpar. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with BuSpar and lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. BuSpar is usually taken for only a short time. Do not take this medication for longer than 4 weeks without your doctors advice Answered by Lela Prazenica 2 years ago.

Call 911 or your local poison control. Never ever have someone throw up without being told to do so by the EMT's or Poision Control. What to do now is turn him on his left side, check his pulse make sure its not slowing down and call 911. Answered by Marcelo Lemle 2 years ago.

CALL 911. ASK FOR POISON CONTROL. GET AN AMBULANCE. Answered by Roseline Bardney 2 years ago.


Buspar ? mental health professional?
Is buspar 10mg 3 times a day too much?does buspar cause fatigue?what are long term side effects? Asked by Mary Kolbusz 2 years ago.

If your doctor prescribed Buspar 10mg 3 times a day then it is not too much. That amount is actually very common. You doctor would not prescribe anything that he or she wasn't sure about how it would affect you. Buspar is not a very strong anti-anxiety medication, it is only prescribed for very mild anxiety so I believe you will be fine. Busbar is known to cause fatigue, however if you just started the medication you should not be worried as it should pass. I do not know exactly what you are on this medication for but perhaps you would like to talk to your doctor about going on an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) instead such as Prozac. Prozac is an excellent medication of anxiety disorders as well as depression and as an SSRI has hardly any side-effects. Anxiety is widely believed to be caused by a lack of serotonin in the brain because you Brain keeps flushing the serotonin in and out. An SSRI blocks the reuptake of your natural serotonin and thus keeps your natural serotonin supply in your brain at all times. Also SSRIs only effect your serotonin levels, while Buspar effects your serotonin and Dopamine levels. Personally, I believe that messing with Dopamine levels can cause more problems. However, you should speak to your doctor about your concerns. If you are seeing a general doctor please switch to a psychiatrist to get your medication. A general doctor had about one class in psychology. Answered by Jarvis Prendes 2 years ago.

You should have got a patients leaflet with it from the pharmacy. This is not a benzodiazapine but of a similar action (like Valium) Usually the starting dose is 7.5mg twice a day but the maximum dose is 60 a day so you've a long way to go to get there! Usually this is prescribed for acute anxiety states and is only used for up to 4 weeks then withdrawn. So you shouldn't be looking at long term side effects. Counselling or therapy should help you beat this and find ways to relax and calm down, self soothing methods. Most people get them for a few days to get over what ever caused the anxiety. GAD is better treated with beta blockers and therapy. It has a number of side effects short term that will be explained on the leaflet or look at them online. No one will get all the side effects most of them are very rare but have to be included. They can cause symptoms that are fairly like the anxiety with racing heart, insomnia, fidgets. Try to ignore any of the side effect details it's easier that way. If you get any that may be side effects then look to see if they are common! It works for me! Good luck Answered by Conception Jungels 2 years ago.


Buspar info anyone?
I am looking for personal experiences from taking buspar... How much did you take (mg) Did it work? Did it relieve anxiety? Did you gain weight? Any side effects? Sexual side effects, good or bad? Did you take it with an SSRI ( prozac, zoloft etc. ) or alone? Asked by Lenora Hugueley 2 years ago.

I took Buspar for 6 months several years ago. I can't remember the exact dosage, but it was a tablet that was 'split' and I only took 1/2 of it, 2 x per day. I have VERY low tolerance for these types of drugs, which is why I took so little. But it was enough. I was totally functional, but was able to keep my anxiety and panic attacks under control. I don't think I would have survived those 6 months without it. I had no side effects that I can think of. They tried me on the absolute lowest introduction dosage of prozac -- and it turned me into a major drooling zombie! They took me OFF that, and gave me the Buspar and it worked great. They also gave me Xanax, as needed -- but I only used that once in a while when a total panic attack threatened to get completely out of control. By the way, I used these because I was going through a major 'triple' crisis -- loss of close family member, loss of job, moving to new home -- plus menopause. Just too much to handle in one short period of time. Answered by Felicia Matejka 2 years ago.


Info on Buspar please?
I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most... Asked by Gus Akimseu 2 years ago.

I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most out of my dollar! 8D Thanks Answered by Valery Capellan 2 years ago.

BuSpar didn't work for me, I took it for 4 years. Klonopin is stronger. There are other forms of anti-anxiety meds out there. If your doc gave you klonopin, it's because he knew that based on your symptoms, BuSpar wouldn't help. Docs always prescribe BuSpar first when they can because it's non habit forming like the others can be. It's possible that you need to take an anti-depressant in combination. Let your doctor decide what's best, not a bunch of random people on Y/A Answered by Cletus Pierson 2 years ago.

Klonopin is more potent and can be addicting.Both drugs are usually ised for anxiety.Klonapin is in the benzo family and are highly addictive.These are physically addictive which if taken for a long period have to be weined.If you can make it on the busbar it is your best option.Stay away from the xanax.This is ussually a doctors next step up. Answered by Dodie Gendler 2 years ago.

It is a lighter med it doesnt knock you out It worked wonders for me within a week I was no longer having daily panic attacks and honestly I never have had side effects from it either after the first cpl of times I took it. Answered by Cathrine Cabanillas 2 years ago.


Anybody else take Buspar?
I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or... Asked by Elliot Shimizu 2 years ago.

I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or should I take it twice a day no matter what? Thanks! Answered by Kary Tomaszewski 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) needs to be taken continuously for it to have any benefit. It does need to be taken exactly as it is prescribed, normally people take about 30 mg divided in 2-3 doses. BuSpar is not a medication that provides rapid relief of anxiety. Like antidepressants BuSpar typically takes 2-4 weeks for benefits. The dose of both medications are fairly low so you may not have any response until your doctor increases the doses. So yes take it twice a day everyday no matter what. If you are not seeing a psychiatrist you really should find one. Typically a general practitioner is not capable of treating trichotillomania effectively. In addition a consultation with a dermatologist is often a good idea. Lastly there are a number of mediations that have been studied for trichotillomania and several have shown promising results. Neither BuSpar or Celexa (citalopram) have been specifically studied for trichotillomania however other medications have been including Orap (pimozide), Anafranil (clomipramine), Prozac (fluoxetine), Luvox (fluvoxamine), and lithium. Using Orap with either Anafranil or Prozac has demonstrated the greatest efficacy. Some of the studies have been based on the idea trichotillomania is related to Tourette syndrome or obsessive compulsive disorder which is why drugs approved for those indications are the most studied. Lithium has also shown some very favourable results. The antidepressant Norpramin (desipramine) was found to have little benefit. Answered by Esperanza Lazard 2 years ago.

If the bottle says "as needed for anxiety" it indeed means to take it only if you are anxious. However, Buspar is not really a medications you take on an "as needed" basis. Also, the does is relatively low (not too low, just lowish). Is the doctor who prescribed you those medications a specialist in psychiatry or a primary care doctor? If it is not a psychiatrist or psychiatric nurse practitioner, I would strongly suggest you go see one for a consultation because primary care doctors often under dose medications. However, I obviously do not know the situation or specifics... Independent from the above, I'd also strongly recommend therapy I've you're not already doing that. It's generally very effective for anxiety disorders. Answered by Gwen Snelson 2 years ago.

I took Buspar, Effexor, and Trileptal for depression and anxiety, but now am off of all of it because I think and my doctor thinks that it was causing me other problems (high white blood cell count, infection). I don't need other health problems so I just got off all of it. I just try to deal with my problems on my own and with God. EDIT: Have your thyroid checked. It's not in top shape even when the doctor says it's okay sometimes. Research it on the internet. Answered by Dung Hillaire 2 years ago.

i took every anti-anxiety med known to man and didn't like any of them. i found that a b vitamin complex did the trick better, anyways. Answered by Debbra Hascup 2 years ago.

I took that **** for only 2 days. I was dizzy and my ears were ringing. I despised it and never took it again. Answered by Sally Medico 2 years ago.


Buspar question?
I am only on my second day of Buspar. And I have had 3 panic attacks. I feel like it is making it worse instead of better. And I am EATING a LOT. Does anyone hae any experiene with Buspar? Will my eating subside? How soon will theese attacks subside? thank you Asked by Jovita Solinger 2 years ago.

Being on your second day of Buspar, it is hard to say if it's going to work for you or not. You need to give a medication such a Buspar time to build up in your system. Buspar is not a fast acting anxiety medication such as Klonopin, Lorazepam, or any others. It needs a chance in order to get mainstreamed in your system. I was on Buspar for about 2 years and I found that it was wonderful for me. I didn't have a problem with being hungry all the time or over eating, but I'm not sure that you do either. I think that when people have anxiety attacks often, their stomachs are being sabotaged by the constant production of adrenaline. Adrenaline, when released into the body, temporarily stops all digestive function. We get used to this as we live with our anxiety being untreated. Once you begin the therapy of your choice, I believe that the desire to eat is because you are hungry. Your anxiety is suppressed and your body begins to mend. Anxiety is very traumatizing to your system. It's going to take some time for all of this to come together for you. If you are worried about weight gain, then watch your diet, eat only when you are truely hungry, and excercise if you want to. You can also try another form of anxiety supression that better suits your and your lifestyle. Just know that anxiety is tricky and hard to live with, but that does not mean that through trial and error you can not find something that will help you to feel better. The attacks that you are having now, should subside, but this may take up to a month before you see any sign of improvement. I know that seems like an eternity, but if it's going to work for you in the long run, isn't it worth giving it a shot and sticking it out? In the mean time, drink chamomile tea, stay away from caffeine, try to relax and pay attention to where and how you breathe. These are all things that in little ways can help you to cope with the attacks that you do have. I hope that I have been of some help to you. I know how hard it is to feel like you are not going to make it sometimes, but believe me, you can and you will. Keep fighting and take back control of your life. Have a good day and take care. Answered by Yuette Coulston 2 years ago.

Eh..I would lay off the alcohol for a while until you figure out how buspar effects you. It is a pretty heavy duty anxiolytic drug and is usually taken with other mental health conditions. It works tho, so take it. Buspar can make you sleepy, lethargic, and generally out of it. Alcohol can makes these effects worse, and it can get to the point where you may stop breathing. You're going to drink no matter what, so just wait for around 14 days, about how long it takes for the med to fully take effect, before drinking. Limit the intake to a few drinks no more than three times a week because there are dangerous interactions like liver failure involved. Be safe and I hope you get a grip on your anxiety. Answered by Bunny Yanko 2 years ago.

I am currently taking Buspar twice a day to keep from feeling anxious. It seems to be working for me. There are days that I don't take it, so give it a chance. If you are still having panic attacks call your doctor and have him put you on Xanax and you will feel the anxiety subside after 30 minutes of taking the medication. Answered by Ann Pennick 2 years ago.

I took buspar for about a year, I can't really say that it really worked for me at all.I always had an appetite with it and the weight gain alone just added to the attacks but I was always talked into continuing with the meds until I finally said enough was enough. After years of fighting anxiety attacks (which I sympathize with you, they really suck to say the LEAST!) I have found a tea called Organic Nighty Night to work the best for me. Traditional Medicinals makes it and the tea can be found in most grocery stores or vitamin shops. Hope this helps. Just remember to say to yourself that they are just an anxiety attack, you are all right and they WILL NOT win. You are master not the anxiety! Answered by Amberly Columbia 2 years ago.

If it is making you feel worse, I would quit taking it and tell your doctor. Maybe they could call in something else for you to try. Meds affect each person differently, what works for some don't work at all for someone else, or have unwanted side effects. Good luck Answered by Angla Kolle 2 years ago.


Buspar (busporine hcl)?
My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a... Asked by Addie Cappelletti 2 years ago.

My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a time. It also makes me a little drowsy, and does wear off within 3 hours and I can feel the nervous feeling again after. CAN this medicine be working for me like this and has it worked like this for anyone else. I have NEVER taken a benzo such as Xanax so maybe this is why I can feel it working because I have not been exposed to anything stronger. I also do not take meds (part of my anxiety) I have to fight myself to take the Buspar to feel better and then I thank myself later. I just don't want to cause my self any harm taking it like this as I have heard taking things like Lexapro as needed will mess your brain up bad. Thanks! Answered by Teresia Boulger 2 years ago.

BuSpar (busprione): Acts by inhibiting the action of serotonin (5-HT); has shown little potential for abuse, a good choice in substance abuse. USes : Management and short-term relief of anxiety disorders. Adult: PO 5 mg tid; may increase by 5 mg/day q2-3d, not to exceed 60 mg/day. Available forms: 5, 10, 15 mg. Alex...this drug is not a classified Benzodiazepine/controlled substance, it is an Azaspirodecanedione/non narctic drug. Lexapro is neither a classified Benzodiazepine. It is a non narcotic drug specifically prescribed for chemical imbalances in the brain. Management of long term relief of anxiety, depression, ... Uses: Major depressive order, anxiety, pyscotic episodes relating to chemical imbalance of brain. While benzos have addictive personalities, due to controlled substance, and can possibly change ones character, not always for the good, BuSpar nor Lexapro contain substance abuse charaters. These medications are prescribed for daily use in order to be effective. It is said that these medications require a 7 day range for optimal relief, however many patients have reported relief in as few as 2-3 days. All medications can become addictive, especially with patients having an addictive nature. All patients have different chemistry make-up, therefore, what may be correct for one, does not fair well for another. Everyone has their story. No one knows your story but you. There are many who have said Lexapro did not work for them. Many have said Lexapro messes with your mind and you should stay away from it. And I'm sure that they believe this due to their experience. However, as I said, one medication is not the answer for everyone. In my case, I began having pyscotic episodes, seeing and hearing things, becoming lost on the way to work or home. I was lucky enough to remain in reality to the extent of realising something was wrong, just didn't know what. I was sent to a Pyschiatrist in the Behavioral Center and was diagnosed with a chemical imbalance, which I was told is quite common in situations in which I had been subjected to, and in such the length of time I had been under these circumstances. So, no one can give you the precise medication to take. It's a question of what works for you. I am all the time suggesting Lexapro because it brought me back into the world. It saved my job, my family, it saved me from losing myself and everyone around me. I also suggest it whenever narcotics are being used, or with non narcotic yet addictive personalities are prescribed. Many of us have problems, and we should try to handle or cope with them without running to the pills. Pills are not a cure, and they cannot erase our problems. In fact, many of us find out much later that the pills are our biggest problem. I do not recommend using pills for the everyday stress of life. However, when I recognize the signs of my own personal experience, or other much more dangerous pills are being taken, YES...I suggest giving Lexapro a try. Hope this has helped rather than offend. Take care, Alex! Answered by Kathryn Garten 2 years ago.


Buspar and alcohol interaction?
I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking... Asked by Peter Budesa 2 years ago.

I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking this medication." so what i want to know is why is it best to avoid alcohol when it apparently has no side effects with alcohol? Answered by Thresa Hutmacher 2 years ago.

Buspar And Alcohol Answered by Gertrud Hotaki 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Buspar and alcohol interaction? I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid... Answered by Tajuana Linzey 2 years ago.

The main reason being that when you ingest alcohol it enters the bloodstream and depending on the amount of alcohol in the bloodstream then the amount of other chemicals is diminished and since the Buspar affects the nervous system if there is an absence of enough chemical to work properly then the drug is ineffective and the sensory receptors may receive false signals thus sending incorrect data to the brain causing anxiety, insomnia or seizures( the side effects may be enhanced by taking alcohol and cutting the presence of the Buspar in the bloodstream). Answered by Len Mayard 2 years ago.

Buspirone And Alcohol Answered by Cordell Mingee 2 years ago.

ARE ANY OF YOU PEOPLE DOCTORS? OR ARE YOU JUST RUNNING YOUR MOUTHS---CITE SOME SOURCES TO BACK UP YOUR CLAIMS---OTHERWISE YOUR INFO IS USELESS TO ME Answered by Nguyet Oakes 2 years ago.


Xanax vs buspar and valerian root?
I am trying to get away from benzos. Please let me know if anyone has had any positive results with valerian root or buspar. Let me put it this way...Has anyone had any "xanax type results or relief" with either of these medications. Please let me know. This is so important to me. Thank you. Asked by Tana Lietz 2 years ago.

BuSpar is actually quite famous for being HATED by ex-benzo users. The type of fix a benzo user is expecting is a rapid and complete relief from crippling anxiety. BuSpar works totally differently and may take weeks (3-6) to completely kick in, and it must be taken everyday, not just when anxiety strikes, as that will do nothing. Also, daily doses above 30mg are required, but most doctors start out low and hope for the best, when this rarely works. I did not have a positive result. All BuSpar did was make me tired, and at bad times of the day like when I was sitting at class at 11am! As for valerian root, most of the information on wikipedia is about the closest you are going to get to anything, and like BuSpar it must be taken everyday and may take weeks to work. Answered by Marcus Arrambide 2 years ago.


Is the medicine Buspar considered an older anxiety medication?
Or is it still widely prescribed? Asked by Shannan Schopmeyer 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) was FDA approved September 29, 1986 so it is a fairly new medication approved for generalized anxiety disorder (it is not indicated for any other anxiety disorders). To give you a comparison here are other FDA approved medications for anxiety and the dates they were FDA approved: Butisol (butabarbital) June 5, 1939 Miltown (meprobamate) April 28, 1955 Librium (chlordiazepoxide) February 24, 1960 Valium (diazepam) November 15, 1963 Ativan (lorazepam) September 30, 1977 Xanax (alprazolam) October 16, 1981 BuSpar (buspirone) September 29, 1986 <----- BuSpar Paxil (paroxetine) December 29, 1992 Effexor (venlafaxine) December 28, 1993 BuSpar is still widely prescribed. In The United States there were 5.4 million prescriptions written in 2009, a 35% increase over the year before making it the 18th most prescribed psychiatric medication in The US. Answered by Lauretta Linquist 2 years ago.

It is an older anxiety medication, but it is still prescribed. I don't know how widely, but it's commonly available in pharmacies. Answered by Rhett Kapsalis 2 years ago.


My boyfriend took 6 buspar being an *** because we were fighting...?
He forgot 30 minutes later he'd taken them and couldn't get off the couch to go throw them up like I wanted him to do. He's currently snoring. (20 mins later)... on the floor. 6 buspar won't kill him right? He's 260lbs. Drank one drink before that. Asked by Emory Chalfant 2 years ago.

CALL 911. BuSpar is an anti-anxiety medicine that affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety. BuSpar is used in the treatment of anxiety disorders and and for short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety, such as fear, tension, irritability, dizziness, pounding heartbeat, and other physical symptoms. BuSpar may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Do not use BuSpar if you are allergic to buspirone, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take BuSpar before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. BuSpar can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase some of the side effects caused by BuSpar. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with BuSpar and lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. BuSpar is usually taken for only a short time. Do not take this medication for longer than 4 weeks without your doctors advice Answered by Basil Pesch 2 years ago.

Call 911 or your local poison control. Never ever have someone throw up without being told to do so by the EMT's or Poision Control. What to do now is turn him on his left side, check his pulse make sure its not slowing down and call 911. Answered by Ethan Duplesis 2 years ago.

CALL 911. ASK FOR POISON CONTROL. GET AN AMBULANCE. Answered by Darla Johansen 2 years ago.


Buspar ? mental health professional?
Is buspar 10mg 3 times a day too much?does buspar cause fatigue?what are long term side effects? Asked by Olivia Jerrel 2 years ago.

If your doctor prescribed Buspar 10mg 3 times a day then it is not too much. That amount is actually very common. You doctor would not prescribe anything that he or she wasn't sure about how it would affect you. Buspar is not a very strong anti-anxiety medication, it is only prescribed for very mild anxiety so I believe you will be fine. Busbar is known to cause fatigue, however if you just started the medication you should not be worried as it should pass. I do not know exactly what you are on this medication for but perhaps you would like to talk to your doctor about going on an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) instead such as Prozac. Prozac is an excellent medication of anxiety disorders as well as depression and as an SSRI has hardly any side-effects. Anxiety is widely believed to be caused by a lack of serotonin in the brain because you Brain keeps flushing the serotonin in and out. An SSRI blocks the reuptake of your natural serotonin and thus keeps your natural serotonin supply in your brain at all times. Also SSRIs only effect your serotonin levels, while Buspar effects your serotonin and Dopamine levels. Personally, I believe that messing with Dopamine levels can cause more problems. However, you should speak to your doctor about your concerns. If you are seeing a general doctor please switch to a psychiatrist to get your medication. A general doctor had about one class in psychology. Answered by Shaunda Trabue 2 years ago.

You should have got a patients leaflet with it from the pharmacy. This is not a benzodiazapine but of a similar action (like Valium) Usually the starting dose is 7.5mg twice a day but the maximum dose is 60 a day so you've a long way to go to get there! Usually this is prescribed for acute anxiety states and is only used for up to 4 weeks then withdrawn. So you shouldn't be looking at long term side effects. Counselling or therapy should help you beat this and find ways to relax and calm down, self soothing methods. Most people get them for a few days to get over what ever caused the anxiety. GAD is better treated with beta blockers and therapy. It has a number of side effects short term that will be explained on the leaflet or look at them online. No one will get all the side effects most of them are very rare but have to be included. They can cause symptoms that are fairly like the anxiety with racing heart, insomnia, fidgets. Try to ignore any of the side effect details it's easier that way. If you get any that may be side effects then look to see if they are common! It works for me! Good luck Answered by Dion Lorente 2 years ago.


Buspar info anyone?
I am looking for personal experiences from taking buspar... How much did you take (mg) Did it work? Did it relieve anxiety? Did you gain weight? Any side effects? Sexual side effects, good or bad? Did you take it with an SSRI ( prozac, zoloft etc. ) or alone? Asked by Katheleen Ruddle 2 years ago.

I took Buspar for 6 months several years ago. I can't remember the exact dosage, but it was a tablet that was 'split' and I only took 1/2 of it, 2 x per day. I have VERY low tolerance for these types of drugs, which is why I took so little. But it was enough. I was totally functional, but was able to keep my anxiety and panic attacks under control. I don't think I would have survived those 6 months without it. I had no side effects that I can think of. They tried me on the absolute lowest introduction dosage of prozac -- and it turned me into a major drooling zombie! They took me OFF that, and gave me the Buspar and it worked great. They also gave me Xanax, as needed -- but I only used that once in a while when a total panic attack threatened to get completely out of control. By the way, I used these because I was going through a major 'triple' crisis -- loss of close family member, loss of job, moving to new home -- plus menopause. Just too much to handle in one short period of time. Answered by Lauralee Worell 2 years ago.


Info on Buspar please?
I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most... Asked by Esperanza Ladell 2 years ago.

I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most out of my dollar! 8D Thanks Answered by Sherill Milles 2 years ago.

BuSpar didn't work for me, I took it for 4 years. Klonopin is stronger. There are other forms of anti-anxiety meds out there. If your doc gave you klonopin, it's because he knew that based on your symptoms, BuSpar wouldn't help. Docs always prescribe BuSpar first when they can because it's non habit forming like the others can be. It's possible that you need to take an anti-depressant in combination. Let your doctor decide what's best, not a bunch of random people on Y/A Answered by Maria Pennig 2 years ago.

Klonopin is more potent and can be addicting.Both drugs are usually ised for anxiety.Klonapin is in the benzo family and are highly addictive.These are physically addictive which if taken for a long period have to be weined.If you can make it on the busbar it is your best option.Stay away from the xanax.This is ussually a doctors next step up. Answered by Trish Youst 2 years ago.

It is a lighter med it doesnt knock you out It worked wonders for me within a week I was no longer having daily panic attacks and honestly I never have had side effects from it either after the first cpl of times I took it. Answered by Ruthanne Dancey 2 years ago.


Anybody else take Buspar?
I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or... Asked by Jovita Sporcic 2 years ago.

I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or should I take it twice a day no matter what? Thanks! Answered by Jenna Gopie 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) needs to be taken continuously for it to have any benefit. It does need to be taken exactly as it is prescribed, normally people take about 30 mg divided in 2-3 doses. BuSpar is not a medication that provides rapid relief of anxiety. Like antidepressants BuSpar typically takes 2-4 weeks for benefits. The dose of both medications are fairly low so you may not have any response until your doctor increases the doses. So yes take it twice a day everyday no matter what. If you are not seeing a psychiatrist you really should find one. Typically a general practitioner is not capable of treating trichotillomania effectively. In addition a consultation with a dermatologist is often a good idea. Lastly there are a number of mediations that have been studied for trichotillomania and several have shown promising results. Neither BuSpar or Celexa (citalopram) have been specifically studied for trichotillomania however other medications have been including Orap (pimozide), Anafranil (clomipramine), Prozac (fluoxetine), Luvox (fluvoxamine), and lithium. Using Orap with either Anafranil or Prozac has demonstrated the greatest efficacy. Some of the studies have been based on the idea trichotillomania is related to Tourette syndrome or obsessive compulsive disorder which is why drugs approved for those indications are the most studied. Lithium has also shown some very favourable results. The antidepressant Norpramin (desipramine) was found to have little benefit. Answered by Misty Mcguffie 2 years ago.

If the bottle says "as needed for anxiety" it indeed means to take it only if you are anxious. However, Buspar is not really a medications you take on an "as needed" basis. Also, the does is relatively low (not too low, just lowish). Is the doctor who prescribed you those medications a specialist in psychiatry or a primary care doctor? If it is not a psychiatrist or psychiatric nurse practitioner, I would strongly suggest you go see one for a consultation because primary care doctors often under dose medications. However, I obviously do not know the situation or specifics... Independent from the above, I'd also strongly recommend therapy I've you're not already doing that. It's generally very effective for anxiety disorders. Answered by Whitley Gassett 2 years ago.

I took Buspar, Effexor, and Trileptal for depression and anxiety, but now am off of all of it because I think and my doctor thinks that it was causing me other problems (high white blood cell count, infection). I don't need other health problems so I just got off all of it. I just try to deal with my problems on my own and with God. EDIT: Have your thyroid checked. It's not in top shape even when the doctor says it's okay sometimes. Research it on the internet. Answered by Renetta Stolzenberg 2 years ago.

i took every anti-anxiety med known to man and didn't like any of them. i found that a b vitamin complex did the trick better, anyways. Answered by Buck Grubb 2 years ago.

I took that **** for only 2 days. I was dizzy and my ears were ringing. I despised it and never took it again. Answered by Taina Delbosque 2 years ago.


Buspar question?
I am only on my second day of Buspar. And I have had 3 panic attacks. I feel like it is making it worse instead of better. And I am EATING a LOT. Does anyone hae any experiene with Buspar? Will my eating subside? How soon will theese attacks subside? thank you Asked by Shala Agresto 2 years ago.

Being on your second day of Buspar, it is hard to say if it's going to work for you or not. You need to give a medication such a Buspar time to build up in your system. Buspar is not a fast acting anxiety medication such as Klonopin, Lorazepam, or any others. It needs a chance in order to get mainstreamed in your system. I was on Buspar for about 2 years and I found that it was wonderful for me. I didn't have a problem with being hungry all the time or over eating, but I'm not sure that you do either. I think that when people have anxiety attacks often, their stomachs are being sabotaged by the constant production of adrenaline. Adrenaline, when released into the body, temporarily stops all digestive function. We get used to this as we live with our anxiety being untreated. Once you begin the therapy of your choice, I believe that the desire to eat is because you are hungry. Your anxiety is suppressed and your body begins to mend. Anxiety is very traumatizing to your system. It's going to take some time for all of this to come together for you. If you are worried about weight gain, then watch your diet, eat only when you are truely hungry, and excercise if you want to. You can also try another form of anxiety supression that better suits your and your lifestyle. Just know that anxiety is tricky and hard to live with, but that does not mean that through trial and error you can not find something that will help you to feel better. The attacks that you are having now, should subside, but this may take up to a month before you see any sign of improvement. I know that seems like an eternity, but if it's going to work for you in the long run, isn't it worth giving it a shot and sticking it out? In the mean time, drink chamomile tea, stay away from caffeine, try to relax and pay attention to where and how you breathe. These are all things that in little ways can help you to cope with the attacks that you do have. I hope that I have been of some help to you. I know how hard it is to feel like you are not going to make it sometimes, but believe me, you can and you will. Keep fighting and take back control of your life. Have a good day and take care. Answered by Ocie Scarnati 2 years ago.

Eh..I would lay off the alcohol for a while until you figure out how buspar effects you. It is a pretty heavy duty anxiolytic drug and is usually taken with other mental health conditions. It works tho, so take it. Buspar can make you sleepy, lethargic, and generally out of it. Alcohol can makes these effects worse, and it can get to the point where you may stop breathing. You're going to drink no matter what, so just wait for around 14 days, about how long it takes for the med to fully take effect, before drinking. Limit the intake to a few drinks no more than three times a week because there are dangerous interactions like liver failure involved. Be safe and I hope you get a grip on your anxiety. Answered by Dina Mickey 2 years ago.

I am currently taking Buspar twice a day to keep from feeling anxious. It seems to be working for me. There are days that I don't take it, so give it a chance. If you are still having panic attacks call your doctor and have him put you on Xanax and you will feel the anxiety subside after 30 minutes of taking the medication. Answered by Corinna Toop 2 years ago.

I took buspar for about a year, I can't really say that it really worked for me at all.I always had an appetite with it and the weight gain alone just added to the attacks but I was always talked into continuing with the meds until I finally said enough was enough. After years of fighting anxiety attacks (which I sympathize with you, they really suck to say the LEAST!) I have found a tea called Organic Nighty Night to work the best for me. Traditional Medicinals makes it and the tea can be found in most grocery stores or vitamin shops. Hope this helps. Just remember to say to yourself that they are just an anxiety attack, you are all right and they WILL NOT win. You are master not the anxiety! Answered by Emelina Gondek 2 years ago.

If it is making you feel worse, I would quit taking it and tell your doctor. Maybe they could call in something else for you to try. Meds affect each person differently, what works for some don't work at all for someone else, or have unwanted side effects. Good luck Answered by Era Asiello 2 years ago.


Buspar (busporine hcl)?
My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a... Asked by Karren Schoof 2 years ago.

My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a time. It also makes me a little drowsy, and does wear off within 3 hours and I can feel the nervous feeling again after. CAN this medicine be working for me like this and has it worked like this for anyone else. I have NEVER taken a benzo such as Xanax so maybe this is why I can feel it working because I have not been exposed to anything stronger. I also do not take meds (part of my anxiety) I have to fight myself to take the Buspar to feel better and then I thank myself later. I just don't want to cause my self any harm taking it like this as I have heard taking things like Lexapro as needed will mess your brain up bad. Thanks! Answered by Royce Schap 2 years ago.

BuSpar (busprione): Acts by inhibiting the action of serotonin (5-HT); has shown little potential for abuse, a good choice in substance abuse. USes : Management and short-term relief of anxiety disorders. Adult: PO 5 mg tid; may increase by 5 mg/day q2-3d, not to exceed 60 mg/day. Available forms: 5, 10, 15 mg. Alex...this drug is not a classified Benzodiazepine/controlled substance, it is an Azaspirodecanedione/non narctic drug. Lexapro is neither a classified Benzodiazepine. It is a non narcotic drug specifically prescribed for chemical imbalances in the brain. Management of long term relief of anxiety, depression, ... Uses: Major depressive order, anxiety, pyscotic episodes relating to chemical imbalance of brain. While benzos have addictive personalities, due to controlled substance, and can possibly change ones character, not always for the good, BuSpar nor Lexapro contain substance abuse charaters. These medications are prescribed for daily use in order to be effective. It is said that these medications require a 7 day range for optimal relief, however many patients have reported relief in as few as 2-3 days. All medications can become addictive, especially with patients having an addictive nature. All patients have different chemistry make-up, therefore, what may be correct for one, does not fair well for another. Everyone has their story. No one knows your story but you. There are many who have said Lexapro did not work for them. Many have said Lexapro messes with your mind and you should stay away from it. And I'm sure that they believe this due to their experience. However, as I said, one medication is not the answer for everyone. In my case, I began having pyscotic episodes, seeing and hearing things, becoming lost on the way to work or home. I was lucky enough to remain in reality to the extent of realising something was wrong, just didn't know what. I was sent to a Pyschiatrist in the Behavioral Center and was diagnosed with a chemical imbalance, which I was told is quite common in situations in which I had been subjected to, and in such the length of time I had been under these circumstances. So, no one can give you the precise medication to take. It's a question of what works for you. I am all the time suggesting Lexapro because it brought me back into the world. It saved my job, my family, it saved me from losing myself and everyone around me. I also suggest it whenever narcotics are being used, or with non narcotic yet addictive personalities are prescribed. Many of us have problems, and we should try to handle or cope with them without running to the pills. Pills are not a cure, and they cannot erase our problems. In fact, many of us find out much later that the pills are our biggest problem. I do not recommend using pills for the everyday stress of life. However, when I recognize the signs of my own personal experience, or other much more dangerous pills are being taken, YES...I suggest giving Lexapro a try. Hope this has helped rather than offend. Take care, Alex! Answered by Ralph Tommasino 2 years ago.


Buspar and alcohol interaction?
I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking... Asked by Hailey Spaun 2 years ago.

I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking this medication." so what i want to know is why is it best to avoid alcohol when it apparently has no side effects with alcohol? Answered by Rubi Elzey 2 years ago.

Buspar And Alcohol Answered by Samuel Zarrabi 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Buspar and alcohol interaction? I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid... Answered by Sammy Doell 2 years ago.

The main reason being that when you ingest alcohol it enters the bloodstream and depending on the amount of alcohol in the bloodstream then the amount of other chemicals is diminished and since the Buspar affects the nervous system if there is an absence of enough chemical to work properly then the drug is ineffective and the sensory receptors may receive false signals thus sending incorrect data to the brain causing anxiety, insomnia or seizures( the side effects may be enhanced by taking alcohol and cutting the presence of the Buspar in the bloodstream). Answered by Ali Indovina 2 years ago.

Buspirone And Alcohol Answered by Nery Presa 2 years ago.

ARE ANY OF YOU PEOPLE DOCTORS? OR ARE YOU JUST RUNNING YOUR MOUTHS---CITE SOME SOURCES TO BACK UP YOUR CLAIMS---OTHERWISE YOUR INFO IS USELESS TO ME Answered by Patty Aimone 2 years ago.


Xanax vs buspar and valerian root?
I am trying to get away from benzos. Please let me know if anyone has had any positive results with valerian root or buspar. Let me put it this way...Has anyone had any "xanax type results or relief" with either of these medications. Please let me know. This is so important to me. Thank you. Asked by Brandie Inaba 2 years ago.

BuSpar is actually quite famous for being HATED by ex-benzo users. The type of fix a benzo user is expecting is a rapid and complete relief from crippling anxiety. BuSpar works totally differently and may take weeks (3-6) to completely kick in, and it must be taken everyday, not just when anxiety strikes, as that will do nothing. Also, daily doses above 30mg are required, but most doctors start out low and hope for the best, when this rarely works. I did not have a positive result. All BuSpar did was make me tired, and at bad times of the day like when I was sitting at class at 11am! As for valerian root, most of the information on wikipedia is about the closest you are going to get to anything, and like BuSpar it must be taken everyday and may take weeks to work. Answered by Ethelene Ohmer 2 years ago.


Is the medicine Buspar considered an older anxiety medication?
Or is it still widely prescribed? Asked by Sha Macayan 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) was FDA approved September 29, 1986 so it is a fairly new medication approved for generalized anxiety disorder (it is not indicated for any other anxiety disorders). To give you a comparison here are other FDA approved medications for anxiety and the dates they were FDA approved: Butisol (butabarbital) June 5, 1939 Miltown (meprobamate) April 28, 1955 Librium (chlordiazepoxide) February 24, 1960 Valium (diazepam) November 15, 1963 Ativan (lorazepam) September 30, 1977 Xanax (alprazolam) October 16, 1981 BuSpar (buspirone) September 29, 1986 <----- BuSpar Paxil (paroxetine) December 29, 1992 Effexor (venlafaxine) December 28, 1993 BuSpar is still widely prescribed. In The United States there were 5.4 million prescriptions written in 2009, a 35% increase over the year before making it the 18th most prescribed psychiatric medication in The US. Answered by Dovie Trichel 2 years ago.

It is an older anxiety medication, but it is still prescribed. I don't know how widely, but it's commonly available in pharmacies. Answered by Manda Quinter 2 years ago.


My boyfriend took 6 buspar being an *** because we were fighting...?
He forgot 30 minutes later he'd taken them and couldn't get off the couch to go throw them up like I wanted him to do. He's currently snoring. (20 mins later)... on the floor. 6 buspar won't kill him right? He's 260lbs. Drank one drink before that. Asked by Rhiannon Stansell 2 years ago.

CALL 911. BuSpar is an anti-anxiety medicine that affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety. BuSpar is used in the treatment of anxiety disorders and and for short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety, such as fear, tension, irritability, dizziness, pounding heartbeat, and other physical symptoms. BuSpar may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Do not use BuSpar if you are allergic to buspirone, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take BuSpar before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. BuSpar can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase some of the side effects caused by BuSpar. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with BuSpar and lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. BuSpar is usually taken for only a short time. Do not take this medication for longer than 4 weeks without your doctors advice Answered by Sergio Hamid 2 years ago.

Call 911 or your local poison control. Never ever have someone throw up without being told to do so by the EMT's or Poision Control. What to do now is turn him on his left side, check his pulse make sure its not slowing down and call 911. Answered by Jeni Henze 2 years ago.

CALL 911. ASK FOR POISON CONTROL. GET AN AMBULANCE. Answered by Trudi Brasel 2 years ago.


Buspar ? mental health professional?
Is buspar 10mg 3 times a day too much?does buspar cause fatigue?what are long term side effects? Asked by Darnell Mulinix 2 years ago.

If your doctor prescribed Buspar 10mg 3 times a day then it is not too much. That amount is actually very common. You doctor would not prescribe anything that he or she wasn't sure about how it would affect you. Buspar is not a very strong anti-anxiety medication, it is only prescribed for very mild anxiety so I believe you will be fine. Busbar is known to cause fatigue, however if you just started the medication you should not be worried as it should pass. I do not know exactly what you are on this medication for but perhaps you would like to talk to your doctor about going on an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) instead such as Prozac. Prozac is an excellent medication of anxiety disorders as well as depression and as an SSRI has hardly any side-effects. Anxiety is widely believed to be caused by a lack of serotonin in the brain because you Brain keeps flushing the serotonin in and out. An SSRI blocks the reuptake of your natural serotonin and thus keeps your natural serotonin supply in your brain at all times. Also SSRIs only effect your serotonin levels, while Buspar effects your serotonin and Dopamine levels. Personally, I believe that messing with Dopamine levels can cause more problems. However, you should speak to your doctor about your concerns. If you are seeing a general doctor please switch to a psychiatrist to get your medication. A general doctor had about one class in psychology. Answered by Maxie Deralph 2 years ago.

You should have got a patients leaflet with it from the pharmacy. This is not a benzodiazapine but of a similar action (like Valium) Usually the starting dose is 7.5mg twice a day but the maximum dose is 60 a day so you've a long way to go to get there! Usually this is prescribed for acute anxiety states and is only used for up to 4 weeks then withdrawn. So you shouldn't be looking at long term side effects. Counselling or therapy should help you beat this and find ways to relax and calm down, self soothing methods. Most people get them for a few days to get over what ever caused the anxiety. GAD is better treated with beta blockers and therapy. It has a number of side effects short term that will be explained on the leaflet or look at them online. No one will get all the side effects most of them are very rare but have to be included. They can cause symptoms that are fairly like the anxiety with racing heart, insomnia, fidgets. Try to ignore any of the side effect details it's easier that way. If you get any that may be side effects then look to see if they are common! It works for me! Good luck Answered by Latoyia Liebig 2 years ago.


Buspar info anyone?
I am looking for personal experiences from taking buspar... How much did you take (mg) Did it work? Did it relieve anxiety? Did you gain weight? Any side effects? Sexual side effects, good or bad? Did you take it with an SSRI ( prozac, zoloft etc. ) or alone? Asked by Charlena Lasser 2 years ago.

I took Buspar for 6 months several years ago. I can't remember the exact dosage, but it was a tablet that was 'split' and I only took 1/2 of it, 2 x per day. I have VERY low tolerance for these types of drugs, which is why I took so little. But it was enough. I was totally functional, but was able to keep my anxiety and panic attacks under control. I don't think I would have survived those 6 months without it. I had no side effects that I can think of. They tried me on the absolute lowest introduction dosage of prozac -- and it turned me into a major drooling zombie! They took me OFF that, and gave me the Buspar and it worked great. They also gave me Xanax, as needed -- but I only used that once in a while when a total panic attack threatened to get completely out of control. By the way, I used these because I was going through a major 'triple' crisis -- loss of close family member, loss of job, moving to new home -- plus menopause. Just too much to handle in one short period of time. Answered by Rheba Tall 2 years ago.


Info on Buspar please?
I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most... Asked by Lacy Gleim 2 years ago.

I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most out of my dollar! 8D Thanks Answered by Renea Gomaz 2 years ago.

BuSpar didn't work for me, I took it for 4 years. Klonopin is stronger. There are other forms of anti-anxiety meds out there. If your doc gave you klonopin, it's because he knew that based on your symptoms, BuSpar wouldn't help. Docs always prescribe BuSpar first when they can because it's non habit forming like the others can be. It's possible that you need to take an anti-depressant in combination. Let your doctor decide what's best, not a bunch of random people on Y/A Answered by Isis Comparoni 2 years ago.

Klonopin is more potent and can be addicting.Both drugs are usually ised for anxiety.Klonapin is in the benzo family and are highly addictive.These are physically addictive which if taken for a long period have to be weined.If you can make it on the busbar it is your best option.Stay away from the xanax.This is ussually a doctors next step up. Answered by Duane Mishulouin 2 years ago.

It is a lighter med it doesnt knock you out It worked wonders for me within a week I was no longer having daily panic attacks and honestly I never have had side effects from it either after the first cpl of times I took it. Answered by Laronda Magano 2 years ago.


Anybody else take Buspar?
I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or... Asked by Elease Sud 2 years ago.

I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or should I take it twice a day no matter what? Thanks! Answered by Kyra Zibell 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) needs to be taken continuously for it to have any benefit. It does need to be taken exactly as it is prescribed, normally people take about 30 mg divided in 2-3 doses. BuSpar is not a medication that provides rapid relief of anxiety. Like antidepressants BuSpar typically takes 2-4 weeks for benefits. The dose of both medications are fairly low so you may not have any response until your doctor increases the doses. So yes take it twice a day everyday no matter what. If you are not seeing a psychiatrist you really should find one. Typically a general practitioner is not capable of treating trichotillomania effectively. In addition a consultation with a dermatologist is often a good idea. Lastly there are a number of mediations that have been studied for trichotillomania and several have shown promising results. Neither BuSpar or Celexa (citalopram) have been specifically studied for trichotillomania however other medications have been including Orap (pimozide), Anafranil (clomipramine), Prozac (fluoxetine), Luvox (fluvoxamine), and lithium. Using Orap with either Anafranil or Prozac has demonstrated the greatest efficacy. Some of the studies have been based on the idea trichotillomania is related to Tourette syndrome or obsessive compulsive disorder which is why drugs approved for those indications are the most studied. Lithium has also shown some very favourable results. The antidepressant Norpramin (desipramine) was found to have little benefit. Answered by Hannah Lowell 2 years ago.

If the bottle says "as needed for anxiety" it indeed means to take it only if you are anxious. However, Buspar is not really a medications you take on an "as needed" basis. Also, the does is relatively low (not too low, just lowish). Is the doctor who prescribed you those medications a specialist in psychiatry or a primary care doctor? If it is not a psychiatrist or psychiatric nurse practitioner, I would strongly suggest you go see one for a consultation because primary care doctors often under dose medications. However, I obviously do not know the situation or specifics... Independent from the above, I'd also strongly recommend therapy I've you're not already doing that. It's generally very effective for anxiety disorders. Answered by Silas Rivero 2 years ago.

I took Buspar, Effexor, and Trileptal for depression and anxiety, but now am off of all of it because I think and my doctor thinks that it was causing me other problems (high white blood cell count, infection). I don't need other health problems so I just got off all of it. I just try to deal with my problems on my own and with God. EDIT: Have your thyroid checked. It's not in top shape even when the doctor says it's okay sometimes. Research it on the internet. Answered by Rina Lorett 2 years ago.

i took every anti-anxiety med known to man and didn't like any of them. i found that a b vitamin complex did the trick better, anyways. Answered by Malissa Perera 2 years ago.

I took that **** for only 2 days. I was dizzy and my ears were ringing. I despised it and never took it again. Answered by Claud Klomp 2 years ago.


Buspar question?
I am only on my second day of Buspar. And I have had 3 panic attacks. I feel like it is making it worse instead of better. And I am EATING a LOT. Does anyone hae any experiene with Buspar? Will my eating subside? How soon will theese attacks subside? thank you Asked by Vernia Weatherbee 2 years ago.

Being on your second day of Buspar, it is hard to say if it's going to work for you or not. You need to give a medication such a Buspar time to build up in your system. Buspar is not a fast acting anxiety medication such as Klonopin, Lorazepam, or any others. It needs a chance in order to get mainstreamed in your system. I was on Buspar for about 2 years and I found that it was wonderful for me. I didn't have a problem with being hungry all the time or over eating, but I'm not sure that you do either. I think that when people have anxiety attacks often, their stomachs are being sabotaged by the constant production of adrenaline. Adrenaline, when released into the body, temporarily stops all digestive function. We get used to this as we live with our anxiety being untreated. Once you begin the therapy of your choice, I believe that the desire to eat is because you are hungry. Your anxiety is suppressed and your body begins to mend. Anxiety is very traumatizing to your system. It's going to take some time for all of this to come together for you. If you are worried about weight gain, then watch your diet, eat only when you are truely hungry, and excercise if you want to. You can also try another form of anxiety supression that better suits your and your lifestyle. Just know that anxiety is tricky and hard to live with, but that does not mean that through trial and error you can not find something that will help you to feel better. The attacks that you are having now, should subside, but this may take up to a month before you see any sign of improvement. I know that seems like an eternity, but if it's going to work for you in the long run, isn't it worth giving it a shot and sticking it out? In the mean time, drink chamomile tea, stay away from caffeine, try to relax and pay attention to where and how you breathe. These are all things that in little ways can help you to cope with the attacks that you do have. I hope that I have been of some help to you. I know how hard it is to feel like you are not going to make it sometimes, but believe me, you can and you will. Keep fighting and take back control of your life. Have a good day and take care. Answered by Otis Bywater 2 years ago.

Eh..I would lay off the alcohol for a while until you figure out how buspar effects you. It is a pretty heavy duty anxiolytic drug and is usually taken with other mental health conditions. It works tho, so take it. Buspar can make you sleepy, lethargic, and generally out of it. Alcohol can makes these effects worse, and it can get to the point where you may stop breathing. You're going to drink no matter what, so just wait for around 14 days, about how long it takes for the med to fully take effect, before drinking. Limit the intake to a few drinks no more than three times a week because there are dangerous interactions like liver failure involved. Be safe and I hope you get a grip on your anxiety. Answered by Lu Otoole 2 years ago.

I am currently taking Buspar twice a day to keep from feeling anxious. It seems to be working for me. There are days that I don't take it, so give it a chance. If you are still having panic attacks call your doctor and have him put you on Xanax and you will feel the anxiety subside after 30 minutes of taking the medication. Answered by Leigha Culnane 2 years ago.

I took buspar for about a year, I can't really say that it really worked for me at all.I always had an appetite with it and the weight gain alone just added to the attacks but I was always talked into continuing with the meds until I finally said enough was enough. After years of fighting anxiety attacks (which I sympathize with you, they really suck to say the LEAST!) I have found a tea called Organic Nighty Night to work the best for me. Traditional Medicinals makes it and the tea can be found in most grocery stores or vitamin shops. Hope this helps. Just remember to say to yourself that they are just an anxiety attack, you are all right and they WILL NOT win. You are master not the anxiety! Answered by Harriett Purwin 2 years ago.

If it is making you feel worse, I would quit taking it and tell your doctor. Maybe they could call in something else for you to try. Meds affect each person differently, what works for some don't work at all for someone else, or have unwanted side effects. Good luck Answered by Ismael Bogden 2 years ago.


Buspar (busporine hcl)?
My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a... Asked by Ramona Lubinski 2 years ago.

My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a time. It also makes me a little drowsy, and does wear off within 3 hours and I can feel the nervous feeling again after. CAN this medicine be working for me like this and has it worked like this for anyone else. I have NEVER taken a benzo such as Xanax so maybe this is why I can feel it working because I have not been exposed to anything stronger. I also do not take meds (part of my anxiety) I have to fight myself to take the Buspar to feel better and then I thank myself later. I just don't want to cause my self any harm taking it like this as I have heard taking things like Lexapro as needed will mess your brain up bad. Thanks! Answered by Cassey Richlin 2 years ago.

BuSpar (busprione): Acts by inhibiting the action of serotonin (5-HT); has shown little potential for abuse, a good choice in substance abuse. USes : Management and short-term relief of anxiety disorders. Adult: PO 5 mg tid; may increase by 5 mg/day q2-3d, not to exceed 60 mg/day. Available forms: 5, 10, 15 mg. Alex...this drug is not a classified Benzodiazepine/controlled substance, it is an Azaspirodecanedione/non narctic drug. Lexapro is neither a classified Benzodiazepine. It is a non narcotic drug specifically prescribed for chemical imbalances in the brain. Management of long term relief of anxiety, depression, ... Uses: Major depressive order, anxiety, pyscotic episodes relating to chemical imbalance of brain. While benzos have addictive personalities, due to controlled substance, and can possibly change ones character, not always for the good, BuSpar nor Lexapro contain substance abuse charaters. These medications are prescribed for daily use in order to be effective. It is said that these medications require a 7 day range for optimal relief, however many patients have reported relief in as few as 2-3 days. All medications can become addictive, especially with patients having an addictive nature. All patients have different chemistry make-up, therefore, what may be correct for one, does not fair well for another. Everyone has their story. No one knows your story but you. There are many who have said Lexapro did not work for them. Many have said Lexapro messes with your mind and you should stay away from it. And I'm sure that they believe this due to their experience. However, as I said, one medication is not the answer for everyone. In my case, I began having pyscotic episodes, seeing and hearing things, becoming lost on the way to work or home. I was lucky enough to remain in reality to the extent of realising something was wrong, just didn't know what. I was sent to a Pyschiatrist in the Behavioral Center and was diagnosed with a chemical imbalance, which I was told is quite common in situations in which I had been subjected to, and in such the length of time I had been under these circumstances. So, no one can give you the precise medication to take. It's a question of what works for you. I am all the time suggesting Lexapro because it brought me back into the world. It saved my job, my family, it saved me from losing myself and everyone around me. I also suggest it whenever narcotics are being used, or with non narcotic yet addictive personalities are prescribed. Many of us have problems, and we should try to handle or cope with them without running to the pills. Pills are not a cure, and they cannot erase our problems. In fact, many of us find out much later that the pills are our biggest problem. I do not recommend using pills for the everyday stress of life. However, when I recognize the signs of my own personal experience, or other much more dangerous pills are being taken, YES...I suggest giving Lexapro a try. Hope this has helped rather than offend. Take care, Alex! Answered by Dalene Hailstock 2 years ago.


Buspar and alcohol interaction?
I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking... Asked by Travis Jufer 2 years ago.

I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking this medication." so what i want to know is why is it best to avoid alcohol when it apparently has no side effects with alcohol? Answered by Merna Shams 2 years ago.

Buspar And Alcohol Answered by Petra Mair 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Buspar and alcohol interaction? I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid... Answered by Jessie Cejka 2 years ago.

The main reason being that when you ingest alcohol it enters the bloodstream and depending on the amount of alcohol in the bloodstream then the amount of other chemicals is diminished and since the Buspar affects the nervous system if there is an absence of enough chemical to work properly then the drug is ineffective and the sensory receptors may receive false signals thus sending incorrect data to the brain causing anxiety, insomnia or seizures( the side effects may be enhanced by taking alcohol and cutting the presence of the Buspar in the bloodstream). Answered by Milda Poole 2 years ago.

Buspirone And Alcohol Answered by Dudley Birden 2 years ago.

ARE ANY OF YOU PEOPLE DOCTORS? OR ARE YOU JUST RUNNING YOUR MOUTHS---CITE SOME SOURCES TO BACK UP YOUR CLAIMS---OTHERWISE YOUR INFO IS USELESS TO ME Answered by Saran Krase 2 years ago.


Xanax vs buspar and valerian root?
I am trying to get away from benzos. Please let me know if anyone has had any positive results with valerian root or buspar. Let me put it this way...Has anyone had any "xanax type results or relief" with either of these medications. Please let me know. This is so important to me. Thank you. Asked by Corazon Sammet 2 years ago.

BuSpar is actually quite famous for being HATED by ex-benzo users. The type of fix a benzo user is expecting is a rapid and complete relief from crippling anxiety. BuSpar works totally differently and may take weeks (3-6) to completely kick in, and it must be taken everyday, not just when anxiety strikes, as that will do nothing. Also, daily doses above 30mg are required, but most doctors start out low and hope for the best, when this rarely works. I did not have a positive result. All BuSpar did was make me tired, and at bad times of the day like when I was sitting at class at 11am! As for valerian root, most of the information on wikipedia is about the closest you are going to get to anything, and like BuSpar it must be taken everyday and may take weeks to work. Answered by Rochelle Mccampbell 2 years ago.


Is the medicine Buspar considered an older anxiety medication?
Or is it still widely prescribed? Asked by Dennis Winham 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) was FDA approved September 29, 1986 so it is a fairly new medication approved for generalized anxiety disorder (it is not indicated for any other anxiety disorders). To give you a comparison here are other FDA approved medications for anxiety and the dates they were FDA approved: Butisol (butabarbital) June 5, 1939 Miltown (meprobamate) April 28, 1955 Librium (chlordiazepoxide) February 24, 1960 Valium (diazepam) November 15, 1963 Ativan (lorazepam) September 30, 1977 Xanax (alprazolam) October 16, 1981 BuSpar (buspirone) September 29, 1986 <----- BuSpar Paxil (paroxetine) December 29, 1992 Effexor (venlafaxine) December 28, 1993 BuSpar is still widely prescribed. In The United States there were 5.4 million prescriptions written in 2009, a 35% increase over the year before making it the 18th most prescribed psychiatric medication in The US. Answered by Edra Lykken 2 years ago.

It is an older anxiety medication, but it is still prescribed. I don't know how widely, but it's commonly available in pharmacies. Answered by Rupert Depasse 2 years ago.


My boyfriend took 6 buspar being an *** because we were fighting...?
He forgot 30 minutes later he'd taken them and couldn't get off the couch to go throw them up like I wanted him to do. He's currently snoring. (20 mins later)... on the floor. 6 buspar won't kill him right? He's 260lbs. Drank one drink before that. Asked by Kristofer Crieghton 2 years ago.

CALL 911. BuSpar is an anti-anxiety medicine that affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety. BuSpar is used in the treatment of anxiety disorders and and for short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety, such as fear, tension, irritability, dizziness, pounding heartbeat, and other physical symptoms. BuSpar may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Do not use BuSpar if you are allergic to buspirone, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take BuSpar before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. BuSpar can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase some of the side effects caused by BuSpar. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with BuSpar and lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. BuSpar is usually taken for only a short time. Do not take this medication for longer than 4 weeks without your doctors advice Answered by Renata Hupf 2 years ago.

Call 911 or your local poison control. Never ever have someone throw up without being told to do so by the EMT's or Poision Control. What to do now is turn him on his left side, check his pulse make sure its not slowing down and call 911. Answered by Yuki Bradstreet 2 years ago.

CALL 911. ASK FOR POISON CONTROL. GET AN AMBULANCE. Answered by Ione Gurry 2 years ago.


Buspar ? mental health professional?
Is buspar 10mg 3 times a day too much?does buspar cause fatigue?what are long term side effects? Asked by Rutha Branske 2 years ago.

If your doctor prescribed Buspar 10mg 3 times a day then it is not too much. That amount is actually very common. You doctor would not prescribe anything that he or she wasn't sure about how it would affect you. Buspar is not a very strong anti-anxiety medication, it is only prescribed for very mild anxiety so I believe you will be fine. Busbar is known to cause fatigue, however if you just started the medication you should not be worried as it should pass. I do not know exactly what you are on this medication for but perhaps you would like to talk to your doctor about going on an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) instead such as Prozac. Prozac is an excellent medication of anxiety disorders as well as depression and as an SSRI has hardly any side-effects. Anxiety is widely believed to be caused by a lack of serotonin in the brain because you Brain keeps flushing the serotonin in and out. An SSRI blocks the reuptake of your natural serotonin and thus keeps your natural serotonin supply in your brain at all times. Also SSRIs only effect your serotonin levels, while Buspar effects your serotonin and Dopamine levels. Personally, I believe that messing with Dopamine levels can cause more problems. However, you should speak to your doctor about your concerns. If you are seeing a general doctor please switch to a psychiatrist to get your medication. A general doctor had about one class in psychology. Answered by Ollie Burglin 2 years ago.

You should have got a patients leaflet with it from the pharmacy. This is not a benzodiazapine but of a similar action (like Valium) Usually the starting dose is 7.5mg twice a day but the maximum dose is 60 a day so you've a long way to go to get there! Usually this is prescribed for acute anxiety states and is only used for up to 4 weeks then withdrawn. So you shouldn't be looking at long term side effects. Counselling or therapy should help you beat this and find ways to relax and calm down, self soothing methods. Most people get them for a few days to get over what ever caused the anxiety. GAD is better treated with beta blockers and therapy. It has a number of side effects short term that will be explained on the leaflet or look at them online. No one will get all the side effects most of them are very rare but have to be included. They can cause symptoms that are fairly like the anxiety with racing heart, insomnia, fidgets. Try to ignore any of the side effect details it's easier that way. If you get any that may be side effects then look to see if they are common! It works for me! Good luck Answered by Tashina Turpin 2 years ago.


Buspar info anyone?
I am looking for personal experiences from taking buspar... How much did you take (mg) Did it work? Did it relieve anxiety? Did you gain weight? Any side effects? Sexual side effects, good or bad? Did you take it with an SSRI ( prozac, zoloft etc. ) or alone? Asked by Terina Crabbe 2 years ago.

I took Buspar for 6 months several years ago. I can't remember the exact dosage, but it was a tablet that was 'split' and I only took 1/2 of it, 2 x per day. I have VERY low tolerance for these types of drugs, which is why I took so little. But it was enough. I was totally functional, but was able to keep my anxiety and panic attacks under control. I don't think I would have survived those 6 months without it. I had no side effects that I can think of. They tried me on the absolute lowest introduction dosage of prozac -- and it turned me into a major drooling zombie! They took me OFF that, and gave me the Buspar and it worked great. They also gave me Xanax, as needed -- but I only used that once in a while when a total panic attack threatened to get completely out of control. By the way, I used these because I was going through a major 'triple' crisis -- loss of close family member, loss of job, moving to new home -- plus menopause. Just too much to handle in one short period of time. Answered by Bibi Hannemann 2 years ago.


Info on Buspar please?
I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most... Asked by Dannielle Brimhall 2 years ago.

I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most out of my dollar! 8D Thanks Answered by Latanya Huron 2 years ago.

BuSpar didn't work for me, I took it for 4 years. Klonopin is stronger. There are other forms of anti-anxiety meds out there. If your doc gave you klonopin, it's because he knew that based on your symptoms, BuSpar wouldn't help. Docs always prescribe BuSpar first when they can because it's non habit forming like the others can be. It's possible that you need to take an anti-depressant in combination. Let your doctor decide what's best, not a bunch of random people on Y/A Answered by Nilda Dahlhauser 2 years ago.

Klonopin is more potent and can be addicting.Both drugs are usually ised for anxiety.Klonapin is in the benzo family and are highly addictive.These are physically addictive which if taken for a long period have to be weined.If you can make it on the busbar it is your best option.Stay away from the xanax.This is ussually a doctors next step up. Answered by Antonietta Croson 2 years ago.

It is a lighter med it doesnt knock you out It worked wonders for me within a week I was no longer having daily panic attacks and honestly I never have had side effects from it either after the first cpl of times I took it. Answered by Betsy Mcmanuis 2 years ago.


Anybody else take Buspar?
I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or... Asked by Shawanna Dys 2 years ago.

I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or should I take it twice a day no matter what? Thanks! Answered by Dario Claburn 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) needs to be taken continuously for it to have any benefit. It does need to be taken exactly as it is prescribed, normally people take about 30 mg divided in 2-3 doses. BuSpar is not a medication that provides rapid relief of anxiety. Like antidepressants BuSpar typically takes 2-4 weeks for benefits. The dose of both medications are fairly low so you may not have any response until your doctor increases the doses. So yes take it twice a day everyday no matter what. If you are not seeing a psychiatrist you really should find one. Typically a general practitioner is not capable of treating trichotillomania effectively. In addition a consultation with a dermatologist is often a good idea. Lastly there are a number of mediations that have been studied for trichotillomania and several have shown promising results. Neither BuSpar or Celexa (citalopram) have been specifically studied for trichotillomania however other medications have been including Orap (pimozide), Anafranil (clomipramine), Prozac (fluoxetine), Luvox (fluvoxamine), and lithium. Using Orap with either Anafranil or Prozac has demonstrated the greatest efficacy. Some of the studies have been based on the idea trichotillomania is related to Tourette syndrome or obsessive compulsive disorder which is why drugs approved for those indications are the most studied. Lithium has also shown some very favourable results. The antidepressant Norpramin (desipramine) was found to have little benefit. Answered by Dagny Cordoba 2 years ago.

If the bottle says "as needed for anxiety" it indeed means to take it only if you are anxious. However, Buspar is not really a medications you take on an "as needed" basis. Also, the does is relatively low (not too low, just lowish). Is the doctor who prescribed you those medications a specialist in psychiatry or a primary care doctor? If it is not a psychiatrist or psychiatric nurse practitioner, I would strongly suggest you go see one for a consultation because primary care doctors often under dose medications. However, I obviously do not know the situation or specifics... Independent from the above, I'd also strongly recommend therapy I've you're not already doing that. It's generally very effective for anxiety disorders. Answered by Leana Nadelson 2 years ago.

I took Buspar, Effexor, and Trileptal for depression and anxiety, but now am off of all of it because I think and my doctor thinks that it was causing me other problems (high white blood cell count, infection). I don't need other health problems so I just got off all of it. I just try to deal with my problems on my own and with God. EDIT: Have your thyroid checked. It's not in top shape even when the doctor says it's okay sometimes. Research it on the internet. Answered by Lavina Mahalko 2 years ago.

i took every anti-anxiety med known to man and didn't like any of them. i found that a b vitamin complex did the trick better, anyways. Answered by Mendy Salus 2 years ago.

I took that **** for only 2 days. I was dizzy and my ears were ringing. I despised it and never took it again. Answered by Clarice Pollutro 2 years ago.


Buspar question?
I am only on my second day of Buspar. And I have had 3 panic attacks. I feel like it is making it worse instead of better. And I am EATING a LOT. Does anyone hae any experiene with Buspar? Will my eating subside? How soon will theese attacks subside? thank you Asked by Barbar Risberg 2 years ago.

Being on your second day of Buspar, it is hard to say if it's going to work for you or not. You need to give a medication such a Buspar time to build up in your system. Buspar is not a fast acting anxiety medication such as Klonopin, Lorazepam, or any others. It needs a chance in order to get mainstreamed in your system. I was on Buspar for about 2 years and I found that it was wonderful for me. I didn't have a problem with being hungry all the time or over eating, but I'm not sure that you do either. I think that when people have anxiety attacks often, their stomachs are being sabotaged by the constant production of adrenaline. Adrenaline, when released into the body, temporarily stops all digestive function. We get used to this as we live with our anxiety being untreated. Once you begin the therapy of your choice, I believe that the desire to eat is because you are hungry. Your anxiety is suppressed and your body begins to mend. Anxiety is very traumatizing to your system. It's going to take some time for all of this to come together for you. If you are worried about weight gain, then watch your diet, eat only when you are truely hungry, and excercise if you want to. You can also try another form of anxiety supression that better suits your and your lifestyle. Just know that anxiety is tricky and hard to live with, but that does not mean that through trial and error you can not find something that will help you to feel better. The attacks that you are having now, should subside, but this may take up to a month before you see any sign of improvement. I know that seems like an eternity, but if it's going to work for you in the long run, isn't it worth giving it a shot and sticking it out? In the mean time, drink chamomile tea, stay away from caffeine, try to relax and pay attention to where and how you breathe. These are all things that in little ways can help you to cope with the attacks that you do have. I hope that I have been of some help to you. I know how hard it is to feel like you are not going to make it sometimes, but believe me, you can and you will. Keep fighting and take back control of your life. Have a good day and take care. Answered by Talia Dannelley 2 years ago.

Eh..I would lay off the alcohol for a while until you figure out how buspar effects you. It is a pretty heavy duty anxiolytic drug and is usually taken with other mental health conditions. It works tho, so take it. Buspar can make you sleepy, lethargic, and generally out of it. Alcohol can makes these effects worse, and it can get to the point where you may stop breathing. You're going to drink no matter what, so just wait for around 14 days, about how long it takes for the med to fully take effect, before drinking. Limit the intake to a few drinks no more than three times a week because there are dangerous interactions like liver failure involved. Be safe and I hope you get a grip on your anxiety. Answered by Shizuko Gosline 2 years ago.

I am currently taking Buspar twice a day to keep from feeling anxious. It seems to be working for me. There are days that I don't take it, so give it a chance. If you are still having panic attacks call your doctor and have him put you on Xanax and you will feel the anxiety subside after 30 minutes of taking the medication. Answered by Luci Scandalios 2 years ago.

I took buspar for about a year, I can't really say that it really worked for me at all.I always had an appetite with it and the weight gain alone just added to the attacks but I was always talked into continuing with the meds until I finally said enough was enough. After years of fighting anxiety attacks (which I sympathize with you, they really suck to say the LEAST!) I have found a tea called Organic Nighty Night to work the best for me. Traditional Medicinals makes it and the tea can be found in most grocery stores or vitamin shops. Hope this helps. Just remember to say to yourself that they are just an anxiety attack, you are all right and they WILL NOT win. You are master not the anxiety! Answered by Fredia Ziobro 2 years ago.

If it is making you feel worse, I would quit taking it and tell your doctor. Maybe they could call in something else for you to try. Meds affect each person differently, what works for some don't work at all for someone else, or have unwanted side effects. Good luck Answered by Evelynn Cuzzort 2 years ago.


Buspar (busporine hcl)?
My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a... Asked by Leatrice Carrothers 2 years ago.

My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a time. It also makes me a little drowsy, and does wear off within 3 hours and I can feel the nervous feeling again after. CAN this medicine be working for me like this and has it worked like this for anyone else. I have NEVER taken a benzo such as Xanax so maybe this is why I can feel it working because I have not been exposed to anything stronger. I also do not take meds (part of my anxiety) I have to fight myself to take the Buspar to feel better and then I thank myself later. I just don't want to cause my self any harm taking it like this as I have heard taking things like Lexapro as needed will mess your brain up bad. Thanks! Answered by Laticia Fout 2 years ago.

BuSpar (busprione): Acts by inhibiting the action of serotonin (5-HT); has shown little potential for abuse, a good choice in substance abuse. USes : Management and short-term relief of anxiety disorders. Adult: PO 5 mg tid; may increase by 5 mg/day q2-3d, not to exceed 60 mg/day. Available forms: 5, 10, 15 mg. Alex...this drug is not a classified Benzodiazepine/controlled substance, it is an Azaspirodecanedione/non narctic drug. Lexapro is neither a classified Benzodiazepine. It is a non narcotic drug specifically prescribed for chemical imbalances in the brain. Management of long term relief of anxiety, depression, ... Uses: Major depressive order, anxiety, pyscotic episodes relating to chemical imbalance of brain. While benzos have addictive personalities, due to controlled substance, and can possibly change ones character, not always for the good, BuSpar nor Lexapro contain substance abuse charaters. These medications are prescribed for daily use in order to be effective. It is said that these medications require a 7 day range for optimal relief, however many patients have reported relief in as few as 2-3 days. All medications can become addictive, especially with patients having an addictive nature. All patients have different chemistry make-up, therefore, what may be correct for one, does not fair well for another. Everyone has their story. No one knows your story but you. There are many who have said Lexapro did not work for them. Many have said Lexapro messes with your mind and you should stay away from it. And I'm sure that they believe this due to their experience. However, as I said, one medication is not the answer for everyone. In my case, I began having pyscotic episodes, seeing and hearing things, becoming lost on the way to work or home. I was lucky enough to remain in reality to the extent of realising something was wrong, just didn't know what. I was sent to a Pyschiatrist in the Behavioral Center and was diagnosed with a chemical imbalance, which I was told is quite common in situations in which I had been subjected to, and in such the length of time I had been under these circumstances. So, no one can give you the precise medication to take. It's a question of what works for you. I am all the time suggesting Lexapro because it brought me back into the world. It saved my job, my family, it saved me from losing myself and everyone around me. I also suggest it whenever narcotics are being used, or with non narcotic yet addictive personalities are prescribed. Many of us have problems, and we should try to handle or cope with them without running to the pills. Pills are not a cure, and they cannot erase our problems. In fact, many of us find out much later that the pills are our biggest problem. I do not recommend using pills for the everyday stress of life. However, when I recognize the signs of my own personal experience, or other much more dangerous pills are being taken, YES...I suggest giving Lexapro a try. Hope this has helped rather than offend. Take care, Alex! Answered by Norberto Willardson 2 years ago.


Buspar and alcohol interaction?
I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking... Asked by Cecile Berquist 2 years ago.

I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking this medication." so what i want to know is why is it best to avoid alcohol when it apparently has no side effects with alcohol? Answered by Nedra Zavitz 2 years ago.

Buspar And Alcohol Answered by Deedee Tayler 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Buspar and alcohol interaction? I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid... Answered by Jayne Roache 2 years ago.

The main reason being that when you ingest alcohol it enters the bloodstream and depending on the amount of alcohol in the bloodstream then the amount of other chemicals is diminished and since the Buspar affects the nervous system if there is an absence of enough chemical to work properly then the drug is ineffective and the sensory receptors may receive false signals thus sending incorrect data to the brain causing anxiety, insomnia or seizures( the side effects may be enhanced by taking alcohol and cutting the presence of the Buspar in the bloodstream). Answered by Noe Grego 2 years ago.

Buspirone And Alcohol Answered by Moises Pechart 2 years ago.

ARE ANY OF YOU PEOPLE DOCTORS? OR ARE YOU JUST RUNNING YOUR MOUTHS---CITE SOME SOURCES TO BACK UP YOUR CLAIMS---OTHERWISE YOUR INFO IS USELESS TO ME Answered by Scarlet Zapp 2 years ago.


Xanax vs buspar and valerian root?
I am trying to get away from benzos. Please let me know if anyone has had any positive results with valerian root or buspar. Let me put it this way...Has anyone had any "xanax type results or relief" with either of these medications. Please let me know. This is so important to me. Thank you. Asked by Lon Goeppinger 2 years ago.

BuSpar is actually quite famous for being HATED by ex-benzo users. The type of fix a benzo user is expecting is a rapid and complete relief from crippling anxiety. BuSpar works totally differently and may take weeks (3-6) to completely kick in, and it must be taken everyday, not just when anxiety strikes, as that will do nothing. Also, daily doses above 30mg are required, but most doctors start out low and hope for the best, when this rarely works. I did not have a positive result. All BuSpar did was make me tired, and at bad times of the day like when I was sitting at class at 11am! As for valerian root, most of the information on wikipedia is about the closest you are going to get to anything, and like BuSpar it must be taken everyday and may take weeks to work. Answered by Berry Miyamura 2 years ago.


Is the medicine Buspar considered an older anxiety medication?
Or is it still widely prescribed? Asked by Arron Silverstone 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) was FDA approved September 29, 1986 so it is a fairly new medication approved for generalized anxiety disorder (it is not indicated for any other anxiety disorders). To give you a comparison here are other FDA approved medications for anxiety and the dates they were FDA approved: Butisol (butabarbital) June 5, 1939 Miltown (meprobamate) April 28, 1955 Librium (chlordiazepoxide) February 24, 1960 Valium (diazepam) November 15, 1963 Ativan (lorazepam) September 30, 1977 Xanax (alprazolam) October 16, 1981 BuSpar (buspirone) September 29, 1986 <----- BuSpar Paxil (paroxetine) December 29, 1992 Effexor (venlafaxine) December 28, 1993 BuSpar is still widely prescribed. In The United States there were 5.4 million prescriptions written in 2009, a 35% increase over the year before making it the 18th most prescribed psychiatric medication in The US. Answered by Sheree Thatcher 2 years ago.

It is an older anxiety medication, but it is still prescribed. I don't know how widely, but it's commonly available in pharmacies. Answered by Seth Miehe 2 years ago.


My boyfriend took 6 buspar being an *** because we were fighting...?
He forgot 30 minutes later he'd taken them and couldn't get off the couch to go throw them up like I wanted him to do. He's currently snoring. (20 mins later)... on the floor. 6 buspar won't kill him right? He's 260lbs. Drank one drink before that. Asked by Hisako Lanthier 2 years ago.

CALL 911. BuSpar is an anti-anxiety medicine that affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety. BuSpar is used in the treatment of anxiety disorders and and for short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety, such as fear, tension, irritability, dizziness, pounding heartbeat, and other physical symptoms. BuSpar may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Do not use BuSpar if you are allergic to buspirone, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take BuSpar before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. BuSpar can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase some of the side effects caused by BuSpar. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with BuSpar and lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. BuSpar is usually taken for only a short time. Do not take this medication for longer than 4 weeks without your doctors advice Answered by Kathyrn Eastridge 2 years ago.

Call 911 or your local poison control. Never ever have someone throw up without being told to do so by the EMT's or Poision Control. What to do now is turn him on his left side, check his pulse make sure its not slowing down and call 911. Answered by Edwina Woitowitz 2 years ago.

CALL 911. ASK FOR POISON CONTROL. GET AN AMBULANCE. Answered by Sara Palomba 2 years ago.


Buspar ? mental health professional?
Is buspar 10mg 3 times a day too much?does buspar cause fatigue?what are long term side effects? Asked by Jeni Garske 2 years ago.

If your doctor prescribed Buspar 10mg 3 times a day then it is not too much. That amount is actually very common. You doctor would not prescribe anything that he or she wasn't sure about how it would affect you. Buspar is not a very strong anti-anxiety medication, it is only prescribed for very mild anxiety so I believe you will be fine. Busbar is known to cause fatigue, however if you just started the medication you should not be worried as it should pass. I do not know exactly what you are on this medication for but perhaps you would like to talk to your doctor about going on an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) instead such as Prozac. Prozac is an excellent medication of anxiety disorders as well as depression and as an SSRI has hardly any side-effects. Anxiety is widely believed to be caused by a lack of serotonin in the brain because you Brain keeps flushing the serotonin in and out. An SSRI blocks the reuptake of your natural serotonin and thus keeps your natural serotonin supply in your brain at all times. Also SSRIs only effect your serotonin levels, while Buspar effects your serotonin and Dopamine levels. Personally, I believe that messing with Dopamine levels can cause more problems. However, you should speak to your doctor about your concerns. If you are seeing a general doctor please switch to a psychiatrist to get your medication. A general doctor had about one class in psychology. Answered by Carroll Niro 2 years ago.

You should have got a patients leaflet with it from the pharmacy. This is not a benzodiazapine but of a similar action (like Valium) Usually the starting dose is 7.5mg twice a day but the maximum dose is 60 a day so you've a long way to go to get there! Usually this is prescribed for acute anxiety states and is only used for up to 4 weeks then withdrawn. So you shouldn't be looking at long term side effects. Counselling or therapy should help you beat this and find ways to relax and calm down, self soothing methods. Most people get them for a few days to get over what ever caused the anxiety. GAD is better treated with beta blockers and therapy. It has a number of side effects short term that will be explained on the leaflet or look at them online. No one will get all the side effects most of them are very rare but have to be included. They can cause symptoms that are fairly like the anxiety with racing heart, insomnia, fidgets. Try to ignore any of the side effect details it's easier that way. If you get any that may be side effects then look to see if they are common! It works for me! Good luck Answered by Mariana Readenour 2 years ago.


Buspar info anyone?
I am looking for personal experiences from taking buspar... How much did you take (mg) Did it work? Did it relieve anxiety? Did you gain weight? Any side effects? Sexual side effects, good or bad? Did you take it with an SSRI ( prozac, zoloft etc. ) or alone? Asked by Calista Alano 2 years ago.

I took Buspar for 6 months several years ago. I can't remember the exact dosage, but it was a tablet that was 'split' and I only took 1/2 of it, 2 x per day. I have VERY low tolerance for these types of drugs, which is why I took so little. But it was enough. I was totally functional, but was able to keep my anxiety and panic attacks under control. I don't think I would have survived those 6 months without it. I had no side effects that I can think of. They tried me on the absolute lowest introduction dosage of prozac -- and it turned me into a major drooling zombie! They took me OFF that, and gave me the Buspar and it worked great. They also gave me Xanax, as needed -- but I only used that once in a while when a total panic attack threatened to get completely out of control. By the way, I used these because I was going through a major 'triple' crisis -- loss of close family member, loss of job, moving to new home -- plus menopause. Just too much to handle in one short period of time. Answered by Daniella Conda 2 years ago.


Info on Buspar please?
I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most... Asked by Sandee Barbe 2 years ago.

I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most out of my dollar! 8D Thanks Answered by Aline Bhat 2 years ago.

BuSpar didn't work for me, I took it for 4 years. Klonopin is stronger. There are other forms of anti-anxiety meds out there. If your doc gave you klonopin, it's because he knew that based on your symptoms, BuSpar wouldn't help. Docs always prescribe BuSpar first when they can because it's non habit forming like the others can be. It's possible that you need to take an anti-depressant in combination. Let your doctor decide what's best, not a bunch of random people on Y/A Answered by Russel Masley 2 years ago.

Klonopin is more potent and can be addicting.Both drugs are usually ised for anxiety.Klonapin is in the benzo family and are highly addictive.These are physically addictive which if taken for a long period have to be weined.If you can make it on the busbar it is your best option.Stay away from the xanax.This is ussually a doctors next step up. Answered by Glynda Snellings 2 years ago.

It is a lighter med it doesnt knock you out It worked wonders for me within a week I was no longer having daily panic attacks and honestly I never have had side effects from it either after the first cpl of times I took it. Answered by Donny Osaile 2 years ago.


Anybody else take Buspar?
I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or... Asked by Evelin Huebner 2 years ago.

I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or should I take it twice a day no matter what? Thanks! Answered by Hyacinth Cosen 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) needs to be taken continuously for it to have any benefit. It does need to be taken exactly as it is prescribed, normally people take about 30 mg divided in 2-3 doses. BuSpar is not a medication that provides rapid relief of anxiety. Like antidepressants BuSpar typically takes 2-4 weeks for benefits. The dose of both medications are fairly low so you may not have any response until your doctor increases the doses. So yes take it twice a day everyday no matter what. If you are not seeing a psychiatrist you really should find one. Typically a general practitioner is not capable of treating trichotillomania effectively. In addition a consultation with a dermatologist is often a good idea. Lastly there are a number of mediations that have been studied for trichotillomania and several have shown promising results. Neither BuSpar or Celexa (citalopram) have been specifically studied for trichotillomania however other medications have been including Orap (pimozide), Anafranil (clomipramine), Prozac (fluoxetine), Luvox (fluvoxamine), and lithium. Using Orap with either Anafranil or Prozac has demonstrated the greatest efficacy. Some of the studies have been based on the idea trichotillomania is related to Tourette syndrome or obsessive compulsive disorder which is why drugs approved for those indications are the most studied. Lithium has also shown some very favourable results. The antidepressant Norpramin (desipramine) was found to have little benefit. Answered by Alissa Shifflett 2 years ago.

If the bottle says "as needed for anxiety" it indeed means to take it only if you are anxious. However, Buspar is not really a medications you take on an "as needed" basis. Also, the does is relatively low (not too low, just lowish). Is the doctor who prescribed you those medications a specialist in psychiatry or a primary care doctor? If it is not a psychiatrist or psychiatric nurse practitioner, I would strongly suggest you go see one for a consultation because primary care doctors often under dose medications. However, I obviously do not know the situation or specifics... Independent from the above, I'd also strongly recommend therapy I've you're not already doing that. It's generally very effective for anxiety disorders. Answered by Elaina Earle 2 years ago.

I took Buspar, Effexor, and Trileptal for depression and anxiety, but now am off of all of it because I think and my doctor thinks that it was causing me other problems (high white blood cell count, infection). I don't need other health problems so I just got off all of it. I just try to deal with my problems on my own and with God. EDIT: Have your thyroid checked. It's not in top shape even when the doctor says it's okay sometimes. Research it on the internet. Answered by Sheilah Kiddy 2 years ago.

i took every anti-anxiety med known to man and didn't like any of them. i found that a b vitamin complex did the trick better, anyways. Answered by Francis Mccalman 2 years ago.

I took that **** for only 2 days. I was dizzy and my ears were ringing. I despised it and never took it again. Answered by Ja Mesi 2 years ago.


Buspar question?
I am only on my second day of Buspar. And I have had 3 panic attacks. I feel like it is making it worse instead of better. And I am EATING a LOT. Does anyone hae any experiene with Buspar? Will my eating subside? How soon will theese attacks subside? thank you Asked by Genevieve Lochotzki 2 years ago.

Being on your second day of Buspar, it is hard to say if it's going to work for you or not. You need to give a medication such a Buspar time to build up in your system. Buspar is not a fast acting anxiety medication such as Klonopin, Lorazepam, or any others. It needs a chance in order to get mainstreamed in your system. I was on Buspar for about 2 years and I found that it was wonderful for me. I didn't have a problem with being hungry all the time or over eating, but I'm not sure that you do either. I think that when people have anxiety attacks often, their stomachs are being sabotaged by the constant production of adrenaline. Adrenaline, when released into the body, temporarily stops all digestive function. We get used to this as we live with our anxiety being untreated. Once you begin the therapy of your choice, I believe that the desire to eat is because you are hungry. Your anxiety is suppressed and your body begins to mend. Anxiety is very traumatizing to your system. It's going to take some time for all of this to come together for you. If you are worried about weight gain, then watch your diet, eat only when you are truely hungry, and excercise if you want to. You can also try another form of anxiety supression that better suits your and your lifestyle. Just know that anxiety is tricky and hard to live with, but that does not mean that through trial and error you can not find something that will help you to feel better. The attacks that you are having now, should subside, but this may take up to a month before you see any sign of improvement. I know that seems like an eternity, but if it's going to work for you in the long run, isn't it worth giving it a shot and sticking it out? In the mean time, drink chamomile tea, stay away from caffeine, try to relax and pay attention to where and how you breathe. These are all things that in little ways can help you to cope with the attacks that you do have. I hope that I have been of some help to you. I know how hard it is to feel like you are not going to make it sometimes, but believe me, you can and you will. Keep fighting and take back control of your life. Have a good day and take care. Answered by Joshua Saetteurn 2 years ago.

Eh..I would lay off the alcohol for a while until you figure out how buspar effects you. It is a pretty heavy duty anxiolytic drug and is usually taken with other mental health conditions. It works tho, so take it. Buspar can make you sleepy, lethargic, and generally out of it. Alcohol can makes these effects worse, and it can get to the point where you may stop breathing. You're going to drink no matter what, so just wait for around 14 days, about how long it takes for the med to fully take effect, before drinking. Limit the intake to a few drinks no more than three times a week because there are dangerous interactions like liver failure involved. Be safe and I hope you get a grip on your anxiety. Answered by Luciana Antich 2 years ago.

I am currently taking Buspar twice a day to keep from feeling anxious. It seems to be working for me. There are days that I don't take it, so give it a chance. If you are still having panic attacks call your doctor and have him put you on Xanax and you will feel the anxiety subside after 30 minutes of taking the medication. Answered by Isreal Spilis 2 years ago.

I took buspar for about a year, I can't really say that it really worked for me at all.I always had an appetite with it and the weight gain alone just added to the attacks but I was always talked into continuing with the meds until I finally said enough was enough. After years of fighting anxiety attacks (which I sympathize with you, they really suck to say the LEAST!) I have found a tea called Organic Nighty Night to work the best for me. Traditional Medicinals makes it and the tea can be found in most grocery stores or vitamin shops. Hope this helps. Just remember to say to yourself that they are just an anxiety attack, you are all right and they WILL NOT win. You are master not the anxiety! Answered by Nathanial Domianus 2 years ago.

If it is making you feel worse, I would quit taking it and tell your doctor. Maybe they could call in something else for you to try. Meds affect each person differently, what works for some don't work at all for someone else, or have unwanted side effects. Good luck Answered by Maurice Eliason 2 years ago.


Buspar (busporine hcl)?
My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a... Asked by Myrtis Buben 2 years ago.

My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a time. It also makes me a little drowsy, and does wear off within 3 hours and I can feel the nervous feeling again after. CAN this medicine be working for me like this and has it worked like this for anyone else. I have NEVER taken a benzo such as Xanax so maybe this is why I can feel it working because I have not been exposed to anything stronger. I also do not take meds (part of my anxiety) I have to fight myself to take the Buspar to feel better and then I thank myself later. I just don't want to cause my self any harm taking it like this as I have heard taking things like Lexapro as needed will mess your brain up bad. Thanks! Answered by Genna Heggen 2 years ago.

BuSpar (busprione): Acts by inhibiting the action of serotonin (5-HT); has shown little potential for abuse, a good choice in substance abuse. USes : Management and short-term relief of anxiety disorders. Adult: PO 5 mg tid; may increase by 5 mg/day q2-3d, not to exceed 60 mg/day. Available forms: 5, 10, 15 mg. Alex...this drug is not a classified Benzodiazepine/controlled substance, it is an Azaspirodecanedione/non narctic drug. Lexapro is neither a classified Benzodiazepine. It is a non narcotic drug specifically prescribed for chemical imbalances in the brain. Management of long term relief of anxiety, depression, ... Uses: Major depressive order, anxiety, pyscotic episodes relating to chemical imbalance of brain. While benzos have addictive personalities, due to controlled substance, and can possibly change ones character, not always for the good, BuSpar nor Lexapro contain substance abuse charaters. These medications are prescribed for daily use in order to be effective. It is said that these medications require a 7 day range for optimal relief, however many patients have reported relief in as few as 2-3 days. All medications can become addictive, especially with patients having an addictive nature. All patients have different chemistry make-up, therefore, what may be correct for one, does not fair well for another. Everyone has their story. No one knows your story but you. There are many who have said Lexapro did not work for them. Many have said Lexapro messes with your mind and you should stay away from it. And I'm sure that they believe this due to their experience. However, as I said, one medication is not the answer for everyone. In my case, I began having pyscotic episodes, seeing and hearing things, becoming lost on the way to work or home. I was lucky enough to remain in reality to the extent of realising something was wrong, just didn't know what. I was sent to a Pyschiatrist in the Behavioral Center and was diagnosed with a chemical imbalance, which I was told is quite common in situations in which I had been subjected to, and in such the length of time I had been under these circumstances. So, no one can give you the precise medication to take. It's a question of what works for you. I am all the time suggesting Lexapro because it brought me back into the world. It saved my job, my family, it saved me from losing myself and everyone around me. I also suggest it whenever narcotics are being used, or with non narcotic yet addictive personalities are prescribed. Many of us have problems, and we should try to handle or cope with them without running to the pills. Pills are not a cure, and they cannot erase our problems. In fact, many of us find out much later that the pills are our biggest problem. I do not recommend using pills for the everyday stress of life. However, when I recognize the signs of my own personal experience, or other much more dangerous pills are being taken, YES...I suggest giving Lexapro a try. Hope this has helped rather than offend. Take care, Alex! Answered by Kortney Prately 2 years ago.


Buspar and alcohol interaction?
I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking... Asked by Ashanti Milbauer 2 years ago.

I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking this medication." so what i want to know is why is it best to avoid alcohol when it apparently has no side effects with alcohol? Answered by Vertie Issa 2 years ago.

Buspar And Alcohol Answered by Rhona Thadison 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Buspar and alcohol interaction? I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid... Answered by Ji Kutzer 2 years ago.

The main reason being that when you ingest alcohol it enters the bloodstream and depending on the amount of alcohol in the bloodstream then the amount of other chemicals is diminished and since the Buspar affects the nervous system if there is an absence of enough chemical to work properly then the drug is ineffective and the sensory receptors may receive false signals thus sending incorrect data to the brain causing anxiety, insomnia or seizures( the side effects may be enhanced by taking alcohol and cutting the presence of the Buspar in the bloodstream). Answered by Raylene Thivener 2 years ago.

Buspirone And Alcohol Answered by Cecilia Midgley 2 years ago.

ARE ANY OF YOU PEOPLE DOCTORS? OR ARE YOU JUST RUNNING YOUR MOUTHS---CITE SOME SOURCES TO BACK UP YOUR CLAIMS---OTHERWISE YOUR INFO IS USELESS TO ME Answered by Monroe Elvin 2 years ago.


Xanax vs buspar and valerian root?
I am trying to get away from benzos. Please let me know if anyone has had any positive results with valerian root or buspar. Let me put it this way...Has anyone had any "xanax type results or relief" with either of these medications. Please let me know. This is so important to me. Thank you. Asked by Randal Kleiman 2 years ago.

BuSpar is actually quite famous for being HATED by ex-benzo users. The type of fix a benzo user is expecting is a rapid and complete relief from crippling anxiety. BuSpar works totally differently and may take weeks (3-6) to completely kick in, and it must be taken everyday, not just when anxiety strikes, as that will do nothing. Also, daily doses above 30mg are required, but most doctors start out low and hope for the best, when this rarely works. I did not have a positive result. All BuSpar did was make me tired, and at bad times of the day like when I was sitting at class at 11am! As for valerian root, most of the information on wikipedia is about the closest you are going to get to anything, and like BuSpar it must be taken everyday and may take weeks to work. Answered by Minnie Wagg 2 years ago.


Is the medicine Buspar considered an older anxiety medication?
Or is it still widely prescribed? Asked by Gidget Trunzo 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) was FDA approved September 29, 1986 so it is a fairly new medication approved for generalized anxiety disorder (it is not indicated for any other anxiety disorders). To give you a comparison here are other FDA approved medications for anxiety and the dates they were FDA approved: Butisol (butabarbital) June 5, 1939 Miltown (meprobamate) April 28, 1955 Librium (chlordiazepoxide) February 24, 1960 Valium (diazepam) November 15, 1963 Ativan (lorazepam) September 30, 1977 Xanax (alprazolam) October 16, 1981 BuSpar (buspirone) September 29, 1986 <----- BuSpar Paxil (paroxetine) December 29, 1992 Effexor (venlafaxine) December 28, 1993 BuSpar is still widely prescribed. In The United States there were 5.4 million prescriptions written in 2009, a 35% increase over the year before making it the 18th most prescribed psychiatric medication in The US. Answered by Jarrett Coakley 2 years ago.

It is an older anxiety medication, but it is still prescribed. I don't know how widely, but it's commonly available in pharmacies. Answered by Micki Byer 2 years ago.


My boyfriend took 6 buspar being an *** because we were fighting...?
He forgot 30 minutes later he'd taken them and couldn't get off the couch to go throw them up like I wanted him to do. He's currently snoring. (20 mins later)... on the floor. 6 buspar won't kill him right? He's 260lbs. Drank one drink before that. Asked by Bulah Wimberly 2 years ago.

CALL 911. BuSpar is an anti-anxiety medicine that affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety. BuSpar is used in the treatment of anxiety disorders and and for short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety, such as fear, tension, irritability, dizziness, pounding heartbeat, and other physical symptoms. BuSpar may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Do not use BuSpar if you are allergic to buspirone, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take BuSpar before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. BuSpar can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase some of the side effects caused by BuSpar. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with BuSpar and lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. BuSpar is usually taken for only a short time. Do not take this medication for longer than 4 weeks without your doctors advice Answered by Rocio Gusewelle 2 years ago.

Call 911 or your local poison control. Never ever have someone throw up without being told to do so by the EMT's or Poision Control. What to do now is turn him on his left side, check his pulse make sure its not slowing down and call 911. Answered by Dulce Callais 2 years ago.

CALL 911. ASK FOR POISON CONTROL. GET AN AMBULANCE. Answered by Lettie Famiano 2 years ago.


Buspar ? mental health professional?
Is buspar 10mg 3 times a day too much?does buspar cause fatigue?what are long term side effects? Asked by Willette Lafrate 2 years ago.

If your doctor prescribed Buspar 10mg 3 times a day then it is not too much. That amount is actually very common. You doctor would not prescribe anything that he or she wasn't sure about how it would affect you. Buspar is not a very strong anti-anxiety medication, it is only prescribed for very mild anxiety so I believe you will be fine. Busbar is known to cause fatigue, however if you just started the medication you should not be worried as it should pass. I do not know exactly what you are on this medication for but perhaps you would like to talk to your doctor about going on an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) instead such as Prozac. Prozac is an excellent medication of anxiety disorders as well as depression and as an SSRI has hardly any side-effects. Anxiety is widely believed to be caused by a lack of serotonin in the brain because you Brain keeps flushing the serotonin in and out. An SSRI blocks the reuptake of your natural serotonin and thus keeps your natural serotonin supply in your brain at all times. Also SSRIs only effect your serotonin levels, while Buspar effects your serotonin and Dopamine levels. Personally, I believe that messing with Dopamine levels can cause more problems. However, you should speak to your doctor about your concerns. If you are seeing a general doctor please switch to a psychiatrist to get your medication. A general doctor had about one class in psychology. Answered by Tiffany Babjeck 2 years ago.

You should have got a patients leaflet with it from the pharmacy. This is not a benzodiazapine but of a similar action (like Valium) Usually the starting dose is 7.5mg twice a day but the maximum dose is 60 a day so you've a long way to go to get there! Usually this is prescribed for acute anxiety states and is only used for up to 4 weeks then withdrawn. So you shouldn't be looking at long term side effects. Counselling or therapy should help you beat this and find ways to relax and calm down, self soothing methods. Most people get them for a few days to get over what ever caused the anxiety. GAD is better treated with beta blockers and therapy. It has a number of side effects short term that will be explained on the leaflet or look at them online. No one will get all the side effects most of them are very rare but have to be included. They can cause symptoms that are fairly like the anxiety with racing heart, insomnia, fidgets. Try to ignore any of the side effect details it's easier that way. If you get any that may be side effects then look to see if they are common! It works for me! Good luck Answered by Dulcie Railing 2 years ago.


Buspar info anyone?
I am looking for personal experiences from taking buspar... How much did you take (mg) Did it work? Did it relieve anxiety? Did you gain weight? Any side effects? Sexual side effects, good or bad? Did you take it with an SSRI ( prozac, zoloft etc. ) or alone? Asked by Vernetta Metellus 2 years ago.

I took Buspar for 6 months several years ago. I can't remember the exact dosage, but it was a tablet that was 'split' and I only took 1/2 of it, 2 x per day. I have VERY low tolerance for these types of drugs, which is why I took so little. But it was enough. I was totally functional, but was able to keep my anxiety and panic attacks under control. I don't think I would have survived those 6 months without it. I had no side effects that I can think of. They tried me on the absolute lowest introduction dosage of prozac -- and it turned me into a major drooling zombie! They took me OFF that, and gave me the Buspar and it worked great. They also gave me Xanax, as needed -- but I only used that once in a while when a total panic attack threatened to get completely out of control. By the way, I used these because I was going through a major 'triple' crisis -- loss of close family member, loss of job, moving to new home -- plus menopause. Just too much to handle in one short period of time. Answered by Jacque Ugolini 2 years ago.


Info on Buspar please?
I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most... Asked by Doyle Pesarchick 2 years ago.

I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most out of my dollar! 8D Thanks Answered by Torie Wanda 2 years ago.

BuSpar didn't work for me, I took it for 4 years. Klonopin is stronger. There are other forms of anti-anxiety meds out there. If your doc gave you klonopin, it's because he knew that based on your symptoms, BuSpar wouldn't help. Docs always prescribe BuSpar first when they can because it's non habit forming like the others can be. It's possible that you need to take an anti-depressant in combination. Let your doctor decide what's best, not a bunch of random people on Y/A Answered by Romona Rico 2 years ago.

Klonopin is more potent and can be addicting.Both drugs are usually ised for anxiety.Klonapin is in the benzo family and are highly addictive.These are physically addictive which if taken for a long period have to be weined.If you can make it on the busbar it is your best option.Stay away from the xanax.This is ussually a doctors next step up. Answered by Charlyn Adamiak 2 years ago.

It is a lighter med it doesnt knock you out It worked wonders for me within a week I was no longer having daily panic attacks and honestly I never have had side effects from it either after the first cpl of times I took it. Answered by Ivana Maxi 2 years ago.


Anybody else take Buspar?
I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or... Asked by Vinnie Vonasek 2 years ago.

I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or should I take it twice a day no matter what? Thanks! Answered by Harvey Mleczynski 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) needs to be taken continuously for it to have any benefit. It does need to be taken exactly as it is prescribed, normally people take about 30 mg divided in 2-3 doses. BuSpar is not a medication that provides rapid relief of anxiety. Like antidepressants BuSpar typically takes 2-4 weeks for benefits. The dose of both medications are fairly low so you may not have any response until your doctor increases the doses. So yes take it twice a day everyday no matter what. If you are not seeing a psychiatrist you really should find one. Typically a general practitioner is not capable of treating trichotillomania effectively. In addition a consultation with a dermatologist is often a good idea. Lastly there are a number of mediations that have been studied for trichotillomania and several have shown promising results. Neither BuSpar or Celexa (citalopram) have been specifically studied for trichotillomania however other medications have been including Orap (pimozide), Anafranil (clomipramine), Prozac (fluoxetine), Luvox (fluvoxamine), and lithium. Using Orap with either Anafranil or Prozac has demonstrated the greatest efficacy. Some of the studies have been based on the idea trichotillomania is related to Tourette syndrome or obsessive compulsive disorder which is why drugs approved for those indications are the most studied. Lithium has also shown some very favourable results. The antidepressant Norpramin (desipramine) was found to have little benefit. Answered by Bethany Sturkey 2 years ago.

If the bottle says "as needed for anxiety" it indeed means to take it only if you are anxious. However, Buspar is not really a medications you take on an "as needed" basis. Also, the does is relatively low (not too low, just lowish). Is the doctor who prescribed you those medications a specialist in psychiatry or a primary care doctor? If it is not a psychiatrist or psychiatric nurse practitioner, I would strongly suggest you go see one for a consultation because primary care doctors often under dose medications. However, I obviously do not know the situation or specifics... Independent from the above, I'd also strongly recommend therapy I've you're not already doing that. It's generally very effective for anxiety disorders. Answered by Pilar Springsteen 2 years ago.

I took Buspar, Effexor, and Trileptal for depression and anxiety, but now am off of all of it because I think and my doctor thinks that it was causing me other problems (high white blood cell count, infection). I don't need other health problems so I just got off all of it. I just try to deal with my problems on my own and with God. EDIT: Have your thyroid checked. It's not in top shape even when the doctor says it's okay sometimes. Research it on the internet. Answered by Sydney Eichberger 2 years ago.

i took every anti-anxiety med known to man and didn't like any of them. i found that a b vitamin complex did the trick better, anyways. Answered by Courtney Demaree 2 years ago.

I took that **** for only 2 days. I was dizzy and my ears were ringing. I despised it and never took it again. Answered by Mammie Catenaccio 2 years ago.


Buspar question?
I am only on my second day of Buspar. And I have had 3 panic attacks. I feel like it is making it worse instead of better. And I am EATING a LOT. Does anyone hae any experiene with Buspar? Will my eating subside? How soon will theese attacks subside? thank you Asked by Mauro Worsfold 2 years ago.

Being on your second day of Buspar, it is hard to say if it's going to work for you or not. You need to give a medication such a Buspar time to build up in your system. Buspar is not a fast acting anxiety medication such as Klonopin, Lorazepam, or any others. It needs a chance in order to get mainstreamed in your system. I was on Buspar for about 2 years and I found that it was wonderful for me. I didn't have a problem with being hungry all the time or over eating, but I'm not sure that you do either. I think that when people have anxiety attacks often, their stomachs are being sabotaged by the constant production of adrenaline. Adrenaline, when released into the body, temporarily stops all digestive function. We get used to this as we live with our anxiety being untreated. Once you begin the therapy of your choice, I believe that the desire to eat is because you are hungry. Your anxiety is suppressed and your body begins to mend. Anxiety is very traumatizing to your system. It's going to take some time for all of this to come together for you. If you are worried about weight gain, then watch your diet, eat only when you are truely hungry, and excercise if you want to. You can also try another form of anxiety supression that better suits your and your lifestyle. Just know that anxiety is tricky and hard to live with, but that does not mean that through trial and error you can not find something that will help you to feel better. The attacks that you are having now, should subside, but this may take up to a month before you see any sign of improvement. I know that seems like an eternity, but if it's going to work for you in the long run, isn't it worth giving it a shot and sticking it out? In the mean time, drink chamomile tea, stay away from caffeine, try to relax and pay attention to where and how you breathe. These are all things that in little ways can help you to cope with the attacks that you do have. I hope that I have been of some help to you. I know how hard it is to feel like you are not going to make it sometimes, but believe me, you can and you will. Keep fighting and take back control of your life. Have a good day and take care. Answered by Melany Bouza 2 years ago.

Eh..I would lay off the alcohol for a while until you figure out how buspar effects you. It is a pretty heavy duty anxiolytic drug and is usually taken with other mental health conditions. It works tho, so take it. Buspar can make you sleepy, lethargic, and generally out of it. Alcohol can makes these effects worse, and it can get to the point where you may stop breathing. You're going to drink no matter what, so just wait for around 14 days, about how long it takes for the med to fully take effect, before drinking. Limit the intake to a few drinks no more than three times a week because there are dangerous interactions like liver failure involved. Be safe and I hope you get a grip on your anxiety. Answered by Kelli Larmer 2 years ago.

I am currently taking Buspar twice a day to keep from feeling anxious. It seems to be working for me. There are days that I don't take it, so give it a chance. If you are still having panic attacks call your doctor and have him put you on Xanax and you will feel the anxiety subside after 30 minutes of taking the medication. Answered by Maddie Rosenstock 2 years ago.

I took buspar for about a year, I can't really say that it really worked for me at all.I always had an appetite with it and the weight gain alone just added to the attacks but I was always talked into continuing with the meds until I finally said enough was enough. After years of fighting anxiety attacks (which I sympathize with you, they really suck to say the LEAST!) I have found a tea called Organic Nighty Night to work the best for me. Traditional Medicinals makes it and the tea can be found in most grocery stores or vitamin shops. Hope this helps. Just remember to say to yourself that they are just an anxiety attack, you are all right and they WILL NOT win. You are master not the anxiety! Answered by Moira Calderone 2 years ago.

If it is making you feel worse, I would quit taking it and tell your doctor. Maybe they could call in something else for you to try. Meds affect each person differently, what works for some don't work at all for someone else, or have unwanted side effects. Good luck Answered by Rufina Dethlefs 2 years ago.


Buspar (busporine hcl)?
My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a... Asked by Cami Pennella 2 years ago.

My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a time. It also makes me a little drowsy, and does wear off within 3 hours and I can feel the nervous feeling again after. CAN this medicine be working for me like this and has it worked like this for anyone else. I have NEVER taken a benzo such as Xanax so maybe this is why I can feel it working because I have not been exposed to anything stronger. I also do not take meds (part of my anxiety) I have to fight myself to take the Buspar to feel better and then I thank myself later. I just don't want to cause my self any harm taking it like this as I have heard taking things like Lexapro as needed will mess your brain up bad. Thanks! Answered by Aaron Sukeforth 2 years ago.

BuSpar (busprione): Acts by inhibiting the action of serotonin (5-HT); has shown little potential for abuse, a good choice in substance abuse. USes : Management and short-term relief of anxiety disorders. Adult: PO 5 mg tid; may increase by 5 mg/day q2-3d, not to exceed 60 mg/day. Available forms: 5, 10, 15 mg. Alex...this drug is not a classified Benzodiazepine/controlled substance, it is an Azaspirodecanedione/non narctic drug. Lexapro is neither a classified Benzodiazepine. It is a non narcotic drug specifically prescribed for chemical imbalances in the brain. Management of long term relief of anxiety, depression, ... Uses: Major depressive order, anxiety, pyscotic episodes relating to chemical imbalance of brain. While benzos have addictive personalities, due to controlled substance, and can possibly change ones character, not always for the good, BuSpar nor Lexapro contain substance abuse charaters. These medications are prescribed for daily use in order to be effective. It is said that these medications require a 7 day range for optimal relief, however many patients have reported relief in as few as 2-3 days. All medications can become addictive, especially with patients having an addictive nature. All patients have different chemistry make-up, therefore, what may be correct for one, does not fair well for another. Everyone has their story. No one knows your story but you. There are many who have said Lexapro did not work for them. Many have said Lexapro messes with your mind and you should stay away from it. And I'm sure that they believe this due to their experience. However, as I said, one medication is not the answer for everyone. In my case, I began having pyscotic episodes, seeing and hearing things, becoming lost on the way to work or home. I was lucky enough to remain in reality to the extent of realising something was wrong, just didn't know what. I was sent to a Pyschiatrist in the Behavioral Center and was diagnosed with a chemical imbalance, which I was told is quite common in situations in which I had been subjected to, and in such the length of time I had been under these circumstances. So, no one can give you the precise medication to take. It's a question of what works for you. I am all the time suggesting Lexapro because it brought me back into the world. It saved my job, my family, it saved me from losing myself and everyone around me. I also suggest it whenever narcotics are being used, or with non narcotic yet addictive personalities are prescribed. Many of us have problems, and we should try to handle or cope with them without running to the pills. Pills are not a cure, and they cannot erase our problems. In fact, many of us find out much later that the pills are our biggest problem. I do not recommend using pills for the everyday stress of life. However, when I recognize the signs of my own personal experience, or other much more dangerous pills are being taken, YES...I suggest giving Lexapro a try. Hope this has helped rather than offend. Take care, Alex! Answered by Dusty Bement 2 years ago.


Buspar and alcohol interaction?
I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking... Asked by Oralee Mershon 2 years ago.

I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking this medication." so what i want to know is why is it best to avoid alcohol when it apparently has no side effects with alcohol? Answered by Tonisha Novicki 2 years ago.

Buspar And Alcohol Answered by Karolyn Gargani 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Buspar and alcohol interaction? I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid... Answered by Anjelica Shingler 2 years ago.

The main reason being that when you ingest alcohol it enters the bloodstream and depending on the amount of alcohol in the bloodstream then the amount of other chemicals is diminished and since the Buspar affects the nervous system if there is an absence of enough chemical to work properly then the drug is ineffective and the sensory receptors may receive false signals thus sending incorrect data to the brain causing anxiety, insomnia or seizures( the side effects may be enhanced by taking alcohol and cutting the presence of the Buspar in the bloodstream). Answered by Clora Jansen 2 years ago.

Buspirone And Alcohol Answered by Abigail Burney 2 years ago.

ARE ANY OF YOU PEOPLE DOCTORS? OR ARE YOU JUST RUNNING YOUR MOUTHS---CITE SOME SOURCES TO BACK UP YOUR CLAIMS---OTHERWISE YOUR INFO IS USELESS TO ME Answered by Jene Vidmar 2 years ago.


Xanax vs buspar and valerian root?
I am trying to get away from benzos. Please let me know if anyone has had any positive results with valerian root or buspar. Let me put it this way...Has anyone had any "xanax type results or relief" with either of these medications. Please let me know. This is so important to me. Thank you. Asked by Erica Stich 2 years ago.

BuSpar is actually quite famous for being HATED by ex-benzo users. The type of fix a benzo user is expecting is a rapid and complete relief from crippling anxiety. BuSpar works totally differently and may take weeks (3-6) to completely kick in, and it must be taken everyday, not just when anxiety strikes, as that will do nothing. Also, daily doses above 30mg are required, but most doctors start out low and hope for the best, when this rarely works. I did not have a positive result. All BuSpar did was make me tired, and at bad times of the day like when I was sitting at class at 11am! As for valerian root, most of the information on wikipedia is about the closest you are going to get to anything, and like BuSpar it must be taken everyday and may take weeks to work. Answered by Susanna Meschino 2 years ago.


Is the medicine Buspar considered an older anxiety medication?
Or is it still widely prescribed? Asked by Ivey Higgs 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) was FDA approved September 29, 1986 so it is a fairly new medication approved for generalized anxiety disorder (it is not indicated for any other anxiety disorders). To give you a comparison here are other FDA approved medications for anxiety and the dates they were FDA approved: Butisol (butabarbital) June 5, 1939 Miltown (meprobamate) April 28, 1955 Librium (chlordiazepoxide) February 24, 1960 Valium (diazepam) November 15, 1963 Ativan (lorazepam) September 30, 1977 Xanax (alprazolam) October 16, 1981 BuSpar (buspirone) September 29, 1986 <----- BuSpar Paxil (paroxetine) December 29, 1992 Effexor (venlafaxine) December 28, 1993 BuSpar is still widely prescribed. In The United States there were 5.4 million prescriptions written in 2009, a 35% increase over the year before making it the 18th most prescribed psychiatric medication in The US. Answered by Thu Womack 2 years ago.

It is an older anxiety medication, but it is still prescribed. I don't know how widely, but it's commonly available in pharmacies. Answered by Mireya Tremper 2 years ago.


My boyfriend took 6 buspar being an *** because we were fighting...?
He forgot 30 minutes later he'd taken them and couldn't get off the couch to go throw them up like I wanted him to do. He's currently snoring. (20 mins later)... on the floor. 6 buspar won't kill him right? He's 260lbs. Drank one drink before that. Asked by Samara Beaufort 2 years ago.

CALL 911. BuSpar is an anti-anxiety medicine that affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety. BuSpar is used in the treatment of anxiety disorders and and for short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety, such as fear, tension, irritability, dizziness, pounding heartbeat, and other physical symptoms. BuSpar may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Do not use BuSpar if you are allergic to buspirone, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take BuSpar before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. BuSpar can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase some of the side effects caused by BuSpar. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with BuSpar and lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. BuSpar is usually taken for only a short time. Do not take this medication for longer than 4 weeks without your doctors advice Answered by Deann Kaizer 2 years ago.

Call 911 or your local poison control. Never ever have someone throw up without being told to do so by the EMT's or Poision Control. What to do now is turn him on his left side, check his pulse make sure its not slowing down and call 911. Answered by Laree Mosbarger 2 years ago.

CALL 911. ASK FOR POISON CONTROL. GET AN AMBULANCE. Answered by Madeline Mouldin 2 years ago.


Buspar ? mental health professional?
Is buspar 10mg 3 times a day too much?does buspar cause fatigue?what are long term side effects? Asked by Ute Wolsdorf 2 years ago.

If your doctor prescribed Buspar 10mg 3 times a day then it is not too much. That amount is actually very common. You doctor would not prescribe anything that he or she wasn't sure about how it would affect you. Buspar is not a very strong anti-anxiety medication, it is only prescribed for very mild anxiety so I believe you will be fine. Busbar is known to cause fatigue, however if you just started the medication you should not be worried as it should pass. I do not know exactly what you are on this medication for but perhaps you would like to talk to your doctor about going on an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) instead such as Prozac. Prozac is an excellent medication of anxiety disorders as well as depression and as an SSRI has hardly any side-effects. Anxiety is widely believed to be caused by a lack of serotonin in the brain because you Brain keeps flushing the serotonin in and out. An SSRI blocks the reuptake of your natural serotonin and thus keeps your natural serotonin supply in your brain at all times. Also SSRIs only effect your serotonin levels, while Buspar effects your serotonin and Dopamine levels. Personally, I believe that messing with Dopamine levels can cause more problems. However, you should speak to your doctor about your concerns. If you are seeing a general doctor please switch to a psychiatrist to get your medication. A general doctor had about one class in psychology. Answered by Dori Schoenfelder 2 years ago.

You should have got a patients leaflet with it from the pharmacy. This is not a benzodiazapine but of a similar action (like Valium) Usually the starting dose is 7.5mg twice a day but the maximum dose is 60 a day so you've a long way to go to get there! Usually this is prescribed for acute anxiety states and is only used for up to 4 weeks then withdrawn. So you shouldn't be looking at long term side effects. Counselling or therapy should help you beat this and find ways to relax and calm down, self soothing methods. Most people get them for a few days to get over what ever caused the anxiety. GAD is better treated with beta blockers and therapy. It has a number of side effects short term that will be explained on the leaflet or look at them online. No one will get all the side effects most of them are very rare but have to be included. They can cause symptoms that are fairly like the anxiety with racing heart, insomnia, fidgets. Try to ignore any of the side effect details it's easier that way. If you get any that may be side effects then look to see if they are common! It works for me! Good luck Answered by Mckenzie Pedersen 2 years ago.


Buspar info anyone?
I am looking for personal experiences from taking buspar... How much did you take (mg) Did it work? Did it relieve anxiety? Did you gain weight? Any side effects? Sexual side effects, good or bad? Did you take it with an SSRI ( prozac, zoloft etc. ) or alone? Asked by Florine Mclaws 2 years ago.

I took Buspar for 6 months several years ago. I can't remember the exact dosage, but it was a tablet that was 'split' and I only took 1/2 of it, 2 x per day. I have VERY low tolerance for these types of drugs, which is why I took so little. But it was enough. I was totally functional, but was able to keep my anxiety and panic attacks under control. I don't think I would have survived those 6 months without it. I had no side effects that I can think of. They tried me on the absolute lowest introduction dosage of prozac -- and it turned me into a major drooling zombie! They took me OFF that, and gave me the Buspar and it worked great. They also gave me Xanax, as needed -- but I only used that once in a while when a total panic attack threatened to get completely out of control. By the way, I used these because I was going through a major 'triple' crisis -- loss of close family member, loss of job, moving to new home -- plus menopause. Just too much to handle in one short period of time. Answered by Emmitt Tilotta 2 years ago.


Info on Buspar please?
I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most... Asked by Jeff Correl 2 years ago.

I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most out of my dollar! 8D Thanks Answered by Adena Zanin 2 years ago.

BuSpar didn't work for me, I took it for 4 years. Klonopin is stronger. There are other forms of anti-anxiety meds out there. If your doc gave you klonopin, it's because he knew that based on your symptoms, BuSpar wouldn't help. Docs always prescribe BuSpar first when they can because it's non habit forming like the others can be. It's possible that you need to take an anti-depressant in combination. Let your doctor decide what's best, not a bunch of random people on Y/A Answered by Adaline Deible 2 years ago.

Klonopin is more potent and can be addicting.Both drugs are usually ised for anxiety.Klonapin is in the benzo family and are highly addictive.These are physically addictive which if taken for a long period have to be weined.If you can make it on the busbar it is your best option.Stay away from the xanax.This is ussually a doctors next step up. Answered by Sabra Riedmayer 2 years ago.

It is a lighter med it doesnt knock you out It worked wonders for me within a week I was no longer having daily panic attacks and honestly I never have had side effects from it either after the first cpl of times I took it. Answered by Arminda Gum 2 years ago.


Anybody else take Buspar?
I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or... Asked by Rachel Oyellette 2 years ago.

I suffer from Trichotillomania brought on by anxiety. My hair is getting so thin my doctor put me on two meds.One is Celexa 20 mgms and Buspar 10mgms. I was wondering what I could expect when taking the Buspar.The bottle says take twice a day as needed for anxiety. Does that mean I only take it when Im worked up or should I take it twice a day no matter what? Thanks! Answered by Owen Jefferson 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) needs to be taken continuously for it to have any benefit. It does need to be taken exactly as it is prescribed, normally people take about 30 mg divided in 2-3 doses. BuSpar is not a medication that provides rapid relief of anxiety. Like antidepressants BuSpar typically takes 2-4 weeks for benefits. The dose of both medications are fairly low so you may not have any response until your doctor increases the doses. So yes take it twice a day everyday no matter what. If you are not seeing a psychiatrist you really should find one. Typically a general practitioner is not capable of treating trichotillomania effectively. In addition a consultation with a dermatologist is often a good idea. Lastly there are a number of mediations that have been studied for trichotillomania and several have shown promising results. Neither BuSpar or Celexa (citalopram) have been specifically studied for trichotillomania however other medications have been including Orap (pimozide), Anafranil (clomipramine), Prozac (fluoxetine), Luvox (fluvoxamine), and lithium. Using Orap with either Anafranil or Prozac has demonstrated the greatest efficacy. Some of the studies have been based on the idea trichotillomania is related to Tourette syndrome or obsessive compulsive disorder which is why drugs approved for those indications are the most studied. Lithium has also shown some very favourable results. The antidepressant Norpramin (desipramine) was found to have little benefit. Answered by Marquita Boshnack 2 years ago.

If the bottle says "as needed for anxiety" it indeed means to take it only if you are anxious. However, Buspar is not really a medications you take on an "as needed" basis. Also, the does is relatively low (not too low, just lowish). Is the doctor who prescribed you those medications a specialist in psychiatry or a primary care doctor? If it is not a psychiatrist or psychiatric nurse practitioner, I would strongly suggest you go see one for a consultation because primary care doctors often under dose medications. However, I obviously do not know the situation or specifics... Independent from the above, I'd also strongly recommend therapy I've you're not already doing that. It's generally very effective for anxiety disorders. Answered by Charmaine Baldos 2 years ago.

I took Buspar, Effexor, and Trileptal for depression and anxiety, but now am off of all of it because I think and my doctor thinks that it was causing me other problems (high white blood cell count, infection). I don't need other health problems so I just got off all of it. I just try to deal with my problems on my own and with God. EDIT: Have your thyroid checked. It's not in top shape even when the doctor says it's okay sometimes. Research it on the internet. Answered by Kristan Glod 2 years ago.

i took every anti-anxiety med known to man and didn't like any of them. i found that a b vitamin complex did the trick better, anyways. Answered by Shirley Ona 2 years ago.

I took that **** for only 2 days. I was dizzy and my ears were ringing. I despised it and never took it again. Answered by Burma Ostler 2 years ago.


Buspar question?
I am only on my second day of Buspar. And I have had 3 panic attacks. I feel like it is making it worse instead of better. And I am EATING a LOT. Does anyone hae any experiene with Buspar? Will my eating subside? How soon will theese attacks subside? thank you Asked by Gennie Lightford 2 years ago.

Being on your second day of Buspar, it is hard to say if it's going to work for you or not. You need to give a medication such a Buspar time to build up in your system. Buspar is not a fast acting anxiety medication such as Klonopin, Lorazepam, or any others. It needs a chance in order to get mainstreamed in your system. I was on Buspar for about 2 years and I found that it was wonderful for me. I didn't have a problem with being hungry all the time or over eating, but I'm not sure that you do either. I think that when people have anxiety attacks often, their stomachs are being sabotaged by the constant production of adrenaline. Adrenaline, when released into the body, temporarily stops all digestive function. We get used to this as we live with our anxiety being untreated. Once you begin the therapy of your choice, I believe that the desire to eat is because you are hungry. Your anxiety is suppressed and your body begins to mend. Anxiety is very traumatizing to your system. It's going to take some time for all of this to come together for you. If you are worried about weight gain, then watch your diet, eat only when you are truely hungry, and excercise if you want to. You can also try another form of anxiety supression that better suits your and your lifestyle. Just know that anxiety is tricky and hard to live with, but that does not mean that through trial and error you can not find something that will help you to feel better. The attacks that you are having now, should subside, but this may take up to a month before you see any sign of improvement. I know that seems like an eternity, but if it's going to work for you in the long run, isn't it worth giving it a shot and sticking it out? In the mean time, drink chamomile tea, stay away from caffeine, try to relax and pay attention to where and how you breathe. These are all things that in little ways can help you to cope with the attacks that you do have. I hope that I have been of some help to you. I know how hard it is to feel like you are not going to make it sometimes, but believe me, you can and you will. Keep fighting and take back control of your life. Have a good day and take care. Answered by Shelia Krylo 2 years ago.

Eh..I would lay off the alcohol for a while until you figure out how buspar effects you. It is a pretty heavy duty anxiolytic drug and is usually taken with other mental health conditions. It works tho, so take it. Buspar can make you sleepy, lethargic, and generally out of it. Alcohol can makes these effects worse, and it can get to the point where you may stop breathing. You're going to drink no matter what, so just wait for around 14 days, about how long it takes for the med to fully take effect, before drinking. Limit the intake to a few drinks no more than three times a week because there are dangerous interactions like liver failure involved. Be safe and I hope you get a grip on your anxiety. Answered by Leopoldo Macurdy 2 years ago.

I am currently taking Buspar twice a day to keep from feeling anxious. It seems to be working for me. There are days that I don't take it, so give it a chance. If you are still having panic attacks call your doctor and have him put you on Xanax and you will feel the anxiety subside after 30 minutes of taking the medication. Answered by Tamra Worsell 2 years ago.

I took buspar for about a year, I can't really say that it really worked for me at all.I always had an appetite with it and the weight gain alone just added to the attacks but I was always talked into continuing with the meds until I finally said enough was enough. After years of fighting anxiety attacks (which I sympathize with you, they really suck to say the LEAST!) I have found a tea called Organic Nighty Night to work the best for me. Traditional Medicinals makes it and the tea can be found in most grocery stores or vitamin shops. Hope this helps. Just remember to say to yourself that they are just an anxiety attack, you are all right and they WILL NOT win. You are master not the anxiety! Answered by Emerson Quent 2 years ago.

If it is making you feel worse, I would quit taking it and tell your doctor. Maybe they could call in something else for you to try. Meds affect each person differently, what works for some don't work at all for someone else, or have unwanted side effects. Good luck Answered by Junko Hanauer 2 years ago.


Buspar (busporine hcl)?
My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a... Asked by Earnest Applegarth 2 years ago.

My doctor prescribed this to me as needed, all I have been reading is that this medicine takes a while to take effect and it should be taken daily. I have taken the medicine at least 4 or 5 times and every time I take it within 30 minutes I feel relaxed and I can think single thoughts rather than 100 thoughts at a time. It also makes me a little drowsy, and does wear off within 3 hours and I can feel the nervous feeling again after. CAN this medicine be working for me like this and has it worked like this for anyone else. I have NEVER taken a benzo such as Xanax so maybe this is why I can feel it working because I have not been exposed to anything stronger. I also do not take meds (part of my anxiety) I have to fight myself to take the Buspar to feel better and then I thank myself later. I just don't want to cause my self any harm taking it like this as I have heard taking things like Lexapro as needed will mess your brain up bad. Thanks! Answered by Corine Ballon 2 years ago.

BuSpar (busprione): Acts by inhibiting the action of serotonin (5-HT); has shown little potential for abuse, a good choice in substance abuse. USes : Management and short-term relief of anxiety disorders. Adult: PO 5 mg tid; may increase by 5 mg/day q2-3d, not to exceed 60 mg/day. Available forms: 5, 10, 15 mg. Alex...this drug is not a classified Benzodiazepine/controlled substance, it is an Azaspirodecanedione/non narctic drug. Lexapro is neither a classified Benzodiazepine. It is a non narcotic drug specifically prescribed for chemical imbalances in the brain. Management of long term relief of anxiety, depression, ... Uses: Major depressive order, anxiety, pyscotic episodes relating to chemical imbalance of brain. While benzos have addictive personalities, due to controlled substance, and can possibly change ones character, not always for the good, BuSpar nor Lexapro contain substance abuse charaters. These medications are prescribed for daily use in order to be effective. It is said that these medications require a 7 day range for optimal relief, however many patients have reported relief in as few as 2-3 days. All medications can become addictive, especially with patients having an addictive nature. All patients have different chemistry make-up, therefore, what may be correct for one, does not fair well for another. Everyone has their story. No one knows your story but you. There are many who have said Lexapro did not work for them. Many have said Lexapro messes with your mind and you should stay away from it. And I'm sure that they believe this due to their experience. However, as I said, one medication is not the answer for everyone. In my case, I began having pyscotic episodes, seeing and hearing things, becoming lost on the way to work or home. I was lucky enough to remain in reality to the extent of realising something was wrong, just didn't know what. I was sent to a Pyschiatrist in the Behavioral Center and was diagnosed with a chemical imbalance, which I was told is quite common in situations in which I had been subjected to, and in such the length of time I had been under these circumstances. So, no one can give you the precise medication to take. It's a question of what works for you. I am all the time suggesting Lexapro because it brought me back into the world. It saved my job, my family, it saved me from losing myself and everyone around me. I also suggest it whenever narcotics are being used, or with non narcotic yet addictive personalities are prescribed. Many of us have problems, and we should try to handle or cope with them without running to the pills. Pills are not a cure, and they cannot erase our problems. In fact, many of us find out much later that the pills are our biggest problem. I do not recommend using pills for the everyday stress of life. However, when I recognize the signs of my own personal experience, or other much more dangerous pills are being taken, YES...I suggest giving Lexapro a try. Hope this has helped rather than offend. Take care, Alex! Answered by Torrie Trasport 2 years ago.


Buspar and alcohol interaction?
I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking... Asked by Jerrie Delzer 2 years ago.

I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid alcohol while taking this medication." so what i want to know is why is it best to avoid alcohol when it apparently has no side effects with alcohol? Answered by Loise Schauble 2 years ago.

Buspar And Alcohol Answered by Bula Nicole 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Buspar and alcohol interaction? I was recently put on Buspar for anxiety and the weekend is comming up and im wondering what if any possible side effects will their be. I did a pretty quick search and found alot of vague details mostly like this "Although BuSpar does not intensify the effects of alcohol, it is best to avoid... Answered by Iliana Deckard 2 years ago.

The main reason being that when you ingest alcohol it enters the bloodstream and depending on the amount of alcohol in the bloodstream then the amount of other chemicals is diminished and since the Buspar affects the nervous system if there is an absence of enough chemical to work properly then the drug is ineffective and the sensory receptors may receive false signals thus sending incorrect data to the brain causing anxiety, insomnia or seizures( the side effects may be enhanced by taking alcohol and cutting the presence of the Buspar in the bloodstream). Answered by Alva Brehon 2 years ago.

Buspirone And Alcohol Answered by Sharron Hilfiger 2 years ago.

ARE ANY OF YOU PEOPLE DOCTORS? OR ARE YOU JUST RUNNING YOUR MOUTHS---CITE SOME SOURCES TO BACK UP YOUR CLAIMS---OTHERWISE YOUR INFO IS USELESS TO ME Answered by Blake Sulipizio 2 years ago.


Xanax vs buspar and valerian root?
I am trying to get away from benzos. Please let me know if anyone has had any positive results with valerian root or buspar. Let me put it this way...Has anyone had any "xanax type results or relief" with either of these medications. Please let me know. This is so important to me. Thank you. Asked by Layla Goda 2 years ago.

BuSpar is actually quite famous for being HATED by ex-benzo users. The type of fix a benzo user is expecting is a rapid and complete relief from crippling anxiety. BuSpar works totally differently and may take weeks (3-6) to completely kick in, and it must be taken everyday, not just when anxiety strikes, as that will do nothing. Also, daily doses above 30mg are required, but most doctors start out low and hope for the best, when this rarely works. I did not have a positive result. All BuSpar did was make me tired, and at bad times of the day like when I was sitting at class at 11am! As for valerian root, most of the information on wikipedia is about the closest you are going to get to anything, and like BuSpar it must be taken everyday and may take weeks to work. Answered by Savannah Holdiness 2 years ago.


Is the medicine Buspar considered an older anxiety medication?
Or is it still widely prescribed? Asked by Monnie Fosler 2 years ago.

BuSpar (buspirone) was FDA approved September 29, 1986 so it is a fairly new medication approved for generalized anxiety disorder (it is not indicated for any other anxiety disorders). To give you a comparison here are other FDA approved medications for anxiety and the dates they were FDA approved: Butisol (butabarbital) June 5, 1939 Miltown (meprobamate) April 28, 1955 Librium (chlordiazepoxide) February 24, 1960 Valium (diazepam) November 15, 1963 Ativan (lorazepam) September 30, 1977 Xanax (alprazolam) October 16, 1981 BuSpar (buspirone) September 29, 1986 <----- BuSpar Paxil (paroxetine) December 29, 1992 Effexor (venlafaxine) December 28, 1993 BuSpar is still widely prescribed. In The United States there were 5.4 million prescriptions written in 2009, a 35% increase over the year before making it the 18th most prescribed psychiatric medication in The US. Answered by Tracie Merrett 2 years ago.

It is an older anxiety medication, but it is still prescribed. I don't know how widely, but it's commonly available in pharmacies. Answered by Windy Cottle 2 years ago.


My boyfriend took 6 buspar being an *** because we were fighting...?
He forgot 30 minutes later he'd taken them and couldn't get off the couch to go throw them up like I wanted him to do. He's currently snoring. (20 mins later)... on the floor. 6 buspar won't kill him right? He's 260lbs. Drank one drink before that. Asked by Salome Ostlie 2 years ago.

CALL 911. BuSpar is an anti-anxiety medicine that affects chemicals in your brain that may become unbalanced and cause anxiety. BuSpar is used in the treatment of anxiety disorders and and for short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety, such as fear, tension, irritability, dizziness, pounding heartbeat, and other physical symptoms. BuSpar may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Do not use BuSpar if you are allergic to buspirone, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take BuSpar before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. BuSpar can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase some of the side effects caused by BuSpar. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with BuSpar and lead to potentially dangerous effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. BuSpar is usually taken for only a short time. Do not take this medication for longer than 4 weeks without your doctors advice Answered by Tambra Petway 2 years ago.

Call 911 or your local poison control. Never ever have someone throw up without being told to do so by the EMT's or Poision Control. What to do now is turn him on his left side, check his pulse make sure its not slowing down and call 911. Answered by Marjorie Quicksey 2 years ago.

CALL 911. ASK FOR POISON CONTROL. GET AN AMBULANCE. Answered by Harris Massed 2 years ago.


Buspar ? mental health professional?
Is buspar 10mg 3 times a day too much?does buspar cause fatigue?what are long term side effects? Asked by Gwendolyn Kundla 2 years ago.

If your doctor prescribed Buspar 10mg 3 times a day then it is not too much. That amount is actually very common. You doctor would not prescribe anything that he or she wasn't sure about how it would affect you. Buspar is not a very strong anti-anxiety medication, it is only prescribed for very mild anxiety so I believe you will be fine. Busbar is known to cause fatigue, however if you just started the medication you should not be worried as it should pass. I do not know exactly what you are on this medication for but perhaps you would like to talk to your doctor about going on an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) instead such as Prozac. Prozac is an excellent medication of anxiety disorders as well as depression and as an SSRI has hardly any side-effects. Anxiety is widely believed to be caused by a lack of serotonin in the brain because you Brain keeps flushing the serotonin in and out. An SSRI blocks the reuptake of your natural serotonin and thus keeps your natural serotonin supply in your brain at all times. Also SSRIs only effect your serotonin levels, while Buspar effects your serotonin and Dopamine levels. Personally, I believe that messing with Dopamine levels can cause more problems. However, you should speak to your doctor about your concerns. If you are seeing a general doctor please switch to a psychiatrist to get your medication. A general doctor had about one class in psychology. Answered by Marielle Breitung 2 years ago.

You should have got a patients leaflet with it from the pharmacy. This is not a benzodiazapine but of a similar action (like Valium) Usually the starting dose is 7.5mg twice a day but the maximum dose is 60 a day so you've a long way to go to get there! Usually this is prescribed for acute anxiety states and is only used for up to 4 weeks then withdrawn. So you shouldn't be looking at long term side effects. Counselling or therapy should help you beat this and find ways to relax and calm down, self soothing methods. Most people get them for a few days to get over what ever caused the anxiety. GAD is better treated with beta blockers and therapy. It has a number of side effects short term that will be explained on the leaflet or look at them online. No one will get all the side effects most of them are very rare but have to be included. They can cause symptoms that are fairly like the anxiety with racing heart, insomnia, fidgets. Try to ignore any of the side effect details it's easier that way. If you get any that may be side effects then look to see if they are common! It works for me! Good luck Answered by Willodean Verdi 2 years ago.


Buspar info anyone?
I am looking for personal experiences from taking buspar... How much did you take (mg) Did it work? Did it relieve anxiety? Did you gain weight? Any side effects? Sexual side effects, good or bad? Did you take it with an SSRI ( prozac, zoloft etc. ) or alone? Asked by Wesley Holl 2 years ago.

I took Buspar for 6 months several years ago. I can't remember the exact dosage, but it was a tablet that was 'split' and I only took 1/2 of it, 2 x per day. I have VERY low tolerance for these types of drugs, which is why I took so little. But it was enough. I was totally functional, but was able to keep my anxiety and panic attacks under control. I don't think I would have survived those 6 months without it. I had no side effects that I can think of. They tried me on the absolute lowest introduction dosage of prozac -- and it turned me into a major drooling zombie! They took me OFF that, and gave me the Buspar and it worked great. They also gave me Xanax, as needed -- but I only used that once in a while when a total panic attack threatened to get completely out of control. By the way, I used these because I was going through a major 'triple' crisis -- loss of close family member, loss of job, moving to new home -- plus menopause. Just too much to handle in one short period of time. Answered by Mattie Ina 2 years ago.


Info on Buspar please?
I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most... Asked by Erik Skibisky 2 years ago.

I need to know which is more potent, buspar or klonopin? I just had a very bad reaction with klonopin, and if buspar is milder I would be able to talk to my doctor about it. I will anyway, I just like to write down my questions so I don't forget to ask him anything. I am self-pay. So I try to get the most out of my dollar! 8D Thanks Answered by Barrett Boys 2 years ago.

BuSpar didn't work for me, I took it for 4 years. Klonopin is stronger. There are other forms of anti-anxiety meds out there. If your doc gave you klonopin, it's because he knew that based on your symptoms, BuSpar wouldn't help. Docs always prescribe BuSpar first when they can because it's non habit forming like the others can be. It's possible that you need to take an anti-depressant in combination. Let your doctor decide what's best, not a bunch of random people on Y/A Answered by Sanora Zierdt 2 years ago.

Klonopin is more potent and can be addicting.Both drugs are usually ised for anxiety.Klonapin is in the benzo family and are highly addictive.These are physically addictive which if taken for a long period have to be weined.If you can make it on the busbar it is your best option.Stay away from the xanax.This is ussually a doctors next step up. Answered by Renata Nettleton 2 years ago.

It is a lighter med it doesnt knock you out It worked wonders for me within a week I was no longer having daily panic attacks and honestly I never have had side effects from it either after the first cpl of times I took it. Answered by Shanika Aldas 2 years ago.


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