9 years ago qwets

My brother has been diagnosed with aortic valve stenosis and also is a smoker and does drink alcohol on the weekends. He knows smoking should be elimated but what about the effects of alcohol? Does this also contribute to his stenosis?

9 years ago Registered Nurse

 
 

Hi dear....I think we all know, even the youngest person on this site knows, there are no GOOD things that come from smoking or alcohol. They are both addicting drugs that people do to appease themselves. Think about it. Alcohol plus smoking are stimulants. A stimulant acts on the body by constricting the blood vessels. Caffeine too. Constricting means to make smaller. He has a valve that is smaller than it should be. No one knows what causes this but hereditary plays an important part. Anyway, since it is naturally smaller, then one goes and drinks or smokes, the entire aortic artery itself gets smaller, along with the other arteries of the body. Take a hose. Turn the water on a good strong ways. Then bend the hose on a spot making it difficult for the same amount of water to flow what was earlier. The water coming out the end is not as strong, yet the origin or the water is as strong at the spigot. All this water is being pushed against the bent area but is not getting through fast enough. The spigot would be the heart. It is still pumping at the same strength it was before the drinking or cigarette, but it is pumping against a brick wall so to speak. The blood is not flowing through the constricted valve, and now not so good through the constricted artery, so it is backing up somewhat as well as the heart tries to pump harder to get it through. It is a perfect recipe for congestive heart failure in the not too distant future. The heart muscle will enlarge as the muscle is being worked too hard, and that is NOT a good thing for a heart. It will be the ventricle that enlarges. The left ventricle pumps the blood through the lungs and since the enlarged ventricle is larger, it it not as effective, so the blood moves through the heart a little slower than normal and the lungs will pick up excess fluid from the blood and deposit it in the lungs making it very difficult to breathe. Left untreated it can kill you. However, the good news is: Surgery can cure the valve. He can have open heart surgery, and a replacement valve placed. My step dad had this and he was like a new man after. Naturally, he quit smoking after smoking for more than 60 years. He was 72 when he had the surgery. Anyway, I think you can tell him all this, but he may not listen. That is just the way it is. Give him the knowledge. He will do with it what he will. Say a little prayer. God bless you and him. Checkout www.healthline.com. It and www.webmd.com are wonderful sites to find out all about medicines and disease processes. I am an RN